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The Tor Project Membership Program


The Tor Project Membership Program




Al Smith August 31, 2020

Today we are officially launching the Tor Project Membership Program, a new way for nonprofit and private sector organizations to financially support our work.

For a while, we have been thinking about how to continue to increase the diversity of funds in the Tor Project’s budget, and more importantly, how to increase unrestricted funds. The latest is a type of funding that allows us to be more agile with software development of tor and other tools.

We decided to create a program inspired by what Tor is based on, community. Our goal is to build a supportive relationship between our nonprofit and private sector organizations that use our technology or want to support our mission.




We are happy to make this announcement with five founding members:

* Avast
* DuckDuckGo
* Insurgo, Inc
* Mullvad VPN
* Team Cymru

Why the membership program is important for the Tor Project:

The traditional grants that nonprofits normally depend on, be that from governments or private foundations, have a long turn-around period (six to twelve months from submission of a proposal to the receipt of a contract and start of work). That means when a proposal is accepted and a grant contract is signed, we begin work on the project that we outlined sometimes more than a year prior.

Because we are a software development organization, relying only on grant funding, forces us into a development model that is slow and archaic. We can never execute solutions immediately in an agile way or experiment quickly with possible paths. We want to change that so we can respond to issues and start projects faster. And we can do that by increasing the number and amount of unrestricted contributions to the Tor Project.




More details on the Membership Program and how to get involved:

For-profit and nonprofit organizations have supported Tor in the past. For example, DuckDuckGo and Mozilla have been long-time supporters. But there was something missing from these relationships. Everything else at Tor is based on community and relationship, so we decided to build a program that could bring some of that community support to our relationships with other organizations.

We know that many companies and organizations would appreciate direct contact with our team for support or consultation on privacy and security. The organizations that become members of our program will have access to our Onion Advisors group to help integrate Tor into their product or answer technical questions about privacy, censorship circumvention, and other areas of our expertise.




Members will also be invited to webinars and exclusive meetings with the Tor Project team to learn about what we are cooking at Tor.

We created three tiers of Membership:




Any membership level contribution means that your organization will have access to Onion Advisors and our special webinars. The only thing that differentiates the tiers is the public promotion of your membership. Each tier will come with varying opportunities to share your organization’s commitment to online privacy with our hundreds of thousands of followers and dedicated community.

If you are interested in becoming a member, please reach out to us at [email protected].

#tor
posted by pod_feeder_v2
#tor
 

The Tor Project Membership Program


The Tor Project Membership Program




Al Smith August 31, 2020

Today we are officially launching the Tor Project Membership Program, a new way for nonprofit and private sector organizations to financially support our work.

For a while, we have been thinking about how to continue to increase the diversity of funds in the Tor Project’s budget, and more importantly, how to increase unrestricted funds. The latest is a type of funding that allows us to be more agile with software development of tor and other tools.

We decided to create a program inspired by what Tor is based on, community. Our goal is to build a supportive relationship between our nonprofit and private sector organizations that use our technology or want to support our mission.




We are happy to make this announcement with five founding members:

* Avast
* DuckDuckGo
* Insurgo, Inc
* Mullvad VPN
* Team Cymru

Why the membership program is important for the Tor Project:

The traditional grants that nonprofits normally depend on, be that from governments or private foundations, have a long turn-around period (six to twelve months from submission of a proposal to the receipt of a contract and start of work). That means when a proposal is accepted and a grant contract is signed, we begin work on the project that we outlined sometimes more than a year prior.

Because we are a software development organization, relying only on grant funding, forces us into a development model that is slow and archaic. We can never execute solutions immediately in an agile way or experiment quickly with possible paths. We want to change that so we can respond to issues and start projects faster. And we can do that by increasing the number and amount of unrestricted contributions to the Tor Project.




More details on the Membership Program and how to get involved:

For-profit and nonprofit organizations have supported Tor in the past. For example, DuckDuckGo and Mozilla have been long-time supporters. But there was something missing from these relationships. Everything else at Tor is based on community and relationship, so we decided to build a program that could bring some of that community support to our relationships with other organizations.

We know that many companies and organizations would appreciate direct contact with our team for support or consultation on privacy and security. The organizations that become members of our program will have access to our Onion Advisors group to help integrate Tor into their product or answer technical questions about privacy, censorship circumvention, and other areas of our expertise.




Members will also be invited to webinars and exclusive meetings with the Tor Project team to learn about what we are cooking at Tor.

We created three tiers of Membership:




Any membership level contribution means that your organization will have access to Onion Advisors and our special webinars. The only thing that differentiates the tiers is the public promotion of your membership. Each tier will come with varying opportunities to share your organization’s commitment to online privacy with our hundreds of thousands of followers and dedicated community.

If you are interested in becoming a member, please reach out to us at [email protected].

#tor
posted by pod_feeder_v2
#tor
 
#TorBridges is not #Tor and it's likely #surveillance because it's in the belly of #Microsoft and the #NSA “meek-azure” bridge
 
#TorBridges is not #Tor and it's likely #surveillance because it's in the belly of #Microsoft and the #NSA “meek-azure” bridge
 

Introducing PrivChat: the Tor Project’s live event series


Introducing PrivChat: the Tor Project’s live event series




Al Smith July 14, 2020

PrivChat is a brand-new fundraising event series held to raise donations for the Tor Project. Through PrivChat, we will bring you important information related to what is happening in tech, human rights, and internet freedom by convening experts for a chat with our community.

Our goal with PrivChat is to build a two-way support system. You will get access to information from leading minds thinking about and working on privacy, technology, and human rights. And with your support, the Tor Project will be more agile in our development, allowing us to respond more rapidly to increasing surveillance and censorship threats (and host more PrivChats)! PrivChats are free to attend, but if you enjoy these events we encourage you to become a monthly donor.

We held our first PrivChat on June 23, and brought together Carmela Troncoso, Assistant Professor at EPFL (Switzerland); Daniel Kahn Gillmor, Senior Staff Technologist for ACLU’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project; and Matt Mitchell, hacker and Tech Fellow at the Ford Foundation, to chat with us about privacy in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, contact tracing, privacy, and the uprising in the U.S. against systemic racism. Watch the the first edition of PrivChat:

One of the Tor Project’s priorities over the last several years (and for the foreseeable future) is to grow our pool of unrestricted funds and improve or launch programs that help us raise these kinds of donations. One of these campaigns is our annual Year-End Campaign (here’s 2019’s) and our Bug Smash Campaign, which takes place every August. PrivChat is part of this strategy.

We plan to hold our next PrivChat in August. If you’re interested in staying up to date about PrivChat, you can: subscribe to our newsletter, watch our events page, follow us on Twitter, or bookmark the PrivChat page.

#tor
posted by pod_feeder_v2
#tor
 

Introducing PrivChat: the Tor Project’s live event series


Introducing PrivChat: the Tor Project’s live event series




Al Smith July 14, 2020

PrivChat is a brand-new fundraising event series held to raise donations for the Tor Project. Through PrivChat, we will bring you important information related to what is happening in tech, human rights, and internet freedom by convening experts for a chat with our community.

Our goal with PrivChat is to build a two-way support system. You will get access to information from leading minds thinking about and working on privacy, technology, and human rights. And with your support, the Tor Project will be more agile in our development, allowing us to respond more rapidly to increasing surveillance and censorship threats (and host more PrivChats)! PrivChats are free to attend, but if you enjoy these events we encourage you to become a monthly donor.

We held our first PrivChat on June 23, and brought together Carmela Troncoso, Assistant Professor at EPFL (Switzerland); Daniel Kahn Gillmor, Senior Staff Technologist for ACLU’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project; and Matt Mitchell, hacker and Tech Fellow at the Ford Foundation, to chat with us about privacy in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, contact tracing, privacy, and the uprising in the U.S. against systemic racism. Watch the the first edition of PrivChat:

One of the Tor Project’s priorities over the last several years (and for the foreseeable future) is to grow our pool of unrestricted funds and improve or launch programs that help us raise these kinds of donations. One of these campaigns is our annual Year-End Campaign (here’s 2019’s) and our Bug Smash Campaign, which takes place every August. PrivChat is part of this strategy.

We plan to hold our next PrivChat in August. If you’re interested in staying up to date about PrivChat, you can: subscribe to our newsletter, watch our events page, follow us on Twitter, or bookmark the PrivChat page.

#tor
posted by pod_feeder_v2
#tor
 

The value of Tor and anonymous contributions to Wikipedia


The value of Tor and anonymous contributions to Wikipedia




Antonela June 25, 2020

Tor users are conscientious about the tools they pick to do what they do online. Often, discussions of controversial topics need a different level of privacy depending on a user's threat models. An activist in the Middle East can provide a different perspective on an article about politics in their own country than a collaborator in northern Europe. And they deserve to add their voices to the conversation safely.

There are many reasons a person might want to be anonymous when they write, edit, or share information. But some web services, including Wikipedia, ban (or have banned) Tor users from participating, effectively banning anonymous contributors.

According to a recently published research paper co-authored by researchers from Drexel, NYU, and the University of Washington, Tor users make high-quality contributions to Wikipedia. And, when they are blocked, as doctoral candidate Chau Tran, the lead author describes, "the collateral damage in the form of unrealized valuable contributions from anonymity seekers is invisible." The authors of the paper include Chau Tran (NYU), Kaylea Champion (UW & CDSC), Andrea Forte (Drexel), Benjamin Mako Hill (UW & CDSC), and Rachel Greenstadt (NYU). The paper was published at the 2020 IEEE Symposium on Security & Privacy between May 18 and 20.

By examining more than 11,000 Wikipedia edits made by Tor users able to bypass Wikipedia's Tor ban between 2007 and 2018, the research team found that Tor users made similar quality edits to those of IP editors, who are non-logged-in users identified by their IP addresses, and first-time editors. The paper notes that Tor users, on average, contributed higher-quality changes to articles than non-logged-in IP editors.

The study also finds that Tor-based editors are more likely than other users to focus on topics that may be considered controversial, such as politics, technology, and religion.

Related research implies Tor users are quite similar to other internet users, and Tor users frequently visit websites in the Alexa top one million.

The new study findings make clear how anonymous users are raising the bar on community discussions and how valuable anonymity is to avoid self-censorship. Anonymity and privacy can help protect users from consequences that may prevent them from interacting with the Wikipedia community.

Wikipedia has tried to block users coming from the Tor network since 2007, alleging vandalism, spam, and abuse. This research tells a different story: that people use Tor to make meaningful contributions to Wikipedia, and Tor may allow some users to add their voice to conversations in which they may not otherwise be safely able to participate.

Freedom on the internet is diminishing globally, and surveillance and censorship are on the rise. Now is the time to finally allow private users to safely participate in building collective knowledge for all humanity.

More info:

* Are anonymity-seekers just like everybody else? An analysis of contributions to Wikipedia from Tor
* Forensic Qualitative Analysis of Contributions to Wikipedia from Anonymity Seeking Users
*
* Community Data Science Article by Benjamin Mako Hill: "Tor users: An untapped resource for Wikipedia?"
* Community Data Science Article by kaylea: "What do people do when they edit Wikipedia through Tor?"
* NYU's press release
* Previous Tor's discussions:
* Tor at the Heart: Online Collaborative Projects
* A call to arms: Helping Internet services accept anonymous users

#tor
posted by pod_feeder_v2
#tor
 

The value of Tor and anonymous contributions to Wikipedia


The value of Tor and anonymous contributions to Wikipedia




Antonela June 25, 2020

Tor users are conscientious about the tools they pick to do what they do online. Often, discussions of controversial topics need a different level of privacy depending on a user's threat models. An activist in the Middle East can provide a different perspective on an article about politics in their own country than a collaborator in northern Europe. And they deserve to add their voices to the conversation safely.

There are many reasons a person might want to be anonymous when they write, edit, or share information. But some web services, including Wikipedia, ban (or have banned) Tor users from participating, effectively banning anonymous contributors.

According to a recently published research paper co-authored by researchers from Drexel, NYU, and the University of Washington, Tor users make high-quality contributions to Wikipedia. And, when they are blocked, as doctoral candidate Chau Tran, the lead author describes, "the collateral damage in the form of unrealized valuable contributions from anonymity seekers is invisible." The authors of the paper include Chau Tran (NYU), Kaylea Champion (UW & CDSC), Andrea Forte (Drexel), Benjamin Mako Hill (UW & CDSC), and Rachel Greenstadt (NYU). The paper was published at the 2020 IEEE Symposium on Security & Privacy between May 18 and 20.

By examining more than 11,000 Wikipedia edits made by Tor users able to bypass Wikipedia's Tor ban between 2007 and 2018, the research team found that Tor users made similar quality edits to those of IP editors, who are non-logged-in users identified by their IP addresses, and first-time editors. The paper notes that Tor users, on average, contributed higher-quality changes to articles than non-logged-in IP editors.

The study also finds that Tor-based editors are more likely than other users to focus on topics that may be considered controversial, such as politics, technology, and religion.

Related research implies Tor users are quite similar to other internet users, and Tor users frequently visit websites in the Alexa top one million.

The new study findings make clear how anonymous users are raising the bar on community discussions and how valuable anonymity is to avoid self-censorship. Anonymity and privacy can help protect users from consequences that may prevent them from interacting with the Wikipedia community.

Wikipedia has tried to block users coming from the Tor network since 2007, alleging vandalism, spam, and abuse. This research tells a different story: that people use Tor to make meaningful contributions to Wikipedia, and Tor may allow some users to add their voice to conversations in which they may not otherwise be safely able to participate.

Freedom on the internet is diminishing globally, and surveillance and censorship are on the rise. Now is the time to finally allow private users to safely participate in building collective knowledge for all humanity.

More info:

* Are anonymity-seekers just like everybody else? An analysis of contributions to Wikipedia from Tor
* Forensic Qualitative Analysis of Contributions to Wikipedia from Anonymity Seeking Users
*
* Community Data Science Article by Benjamin Mako Hill: "Tor users: An untapped resource for Wikipedia?"
* Community Data Science Article by kaylea: "What do people do when they edit Wikipedia through Tor?"
* NYU's press release
* Previous Tor's discussions:
* Tor at the Heart: Online Collaborative Projects
* A call to arms: Helping Internet services accept anonymous users

#tor
posted by pod_feeder_v2
#tor
 
#briar #briarproject #p2p #messenger #tor

Guten Morgen liebe Liebende.

Hat jemand von den anwesenden Entitäten Erfahrungen mot dem Briar Messenger gemacht und mag von berichten? Niemand würde sich freuen.
 
Jetzt sind Deutschland und Europa in der Verantwortung
https://netzpolitik.org/2020/jetzt-sind-deutschland-und-europa-in-der-verantwortung/
#News #Europa #Deutschland #Germany #Politik #Privatsphäre #Anonymität #Internet #PC #Computer #Handy #TV #Tor #Ende-zu-Ende-Verschlüsselung #WireGuard #Signal #Software #OpenSource
Jetzt sind Deutschland und Europa in der Verantwortung
 
Jetzt sind Deutschland und Europa in der Verantwortung
https://netzpolitik.org/2020/jetzt-sind-deutschland-und-europa-in-der-verantwortung/
#News #Europa #Deutschland #Germany #Politik #Privatsphäre #Anonymität #Internet #PC #Computer #Handy #TV #Tor #Ende-zu-Ende-Verschlüsselung #WireGuard #Signal #Software #OpenSource
Jetzt sind Deutschland und Europa in der Verantwortung
 
Gibberfish Social now supports the Onion-Location header option for Tor Browser. If you visit https://social.gibberfish.org using the newest version of Tor Browser you will be prompted to use the .onion address instead, which is http://hvuzry6mcdmrj7hq.onion, and it will remember it for you. Now you don't need to remember that clunky Tor url!

#gibberfish #tor #onionlocation #privacy #anonymity
 

Wanna break free from #Google?


Here are some recommendations:
What did I missed? What is you favourite alternative? and why?
#freesoftware #foss #floss #open-source #opensource #linux #gnu-linux #fdroid #technoethical #mobile #software #privacy #surveillance #freedom
 

Wanna break free from #Google?


Here are some recommendations:
What did I missed? What is you favourite alternative? and why?
#freesoftware #foss #floss #open-source #opensource #linux #gnu-linux #fdroid #technoethical #mobile #software #privacy #surveillance #freedom
 

Wanna break free from #Google?


Here are some recommendations:
What did I missed? What is you favourite alternative? and why?
#freesoftware #foss #floss #open-source #opensource #linux #gnu-linux #fdroid #technoethical #mobile #software #privacy #surveillance #freedom
 
Image/Photo

Tails version 3.15

https://tails.boum.org/


💻 #privacidad para todxs en todas partes #SoftwareLibre #Tor #Tails #anonimato #cifrado versión 3.15 😉 #autodefensadigital
 
@Rainer "diaspora" Sokoll Mag sein. Keine Ahnung, aus welchem Exit ich gerade rauskomme, aber ist mir eigentlich auch egal. Für heute ist meine Frustrationstoleranzgrenze überschritten. 🙁

#FreiesInternet #Tor
 
@Passagier 451
One more step 
Please complete the security check to access www.mimikama.at

Klar, mimikama darf natürlich nicht anonym via #tor aufgerufen werden. Bitte vorher bei Google registrieren!
Bestimmt haben die auch Analytics eingebunden.
Wie ich das leid bin...
#omg

Gibt es etwas für BitTorrent?

#NoGoogleCaptcha
 

Avoiding Webscraping Throttling Using Python and Tor as a Proxy


HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20429462
Posted by bored_hacker (karma: 64)
Post stats: Points: 113 - Comments: 52 - 2019-07-13T18:34:52Z

\#HackerNews #and #avoiding #proxy #python #throttling #tor #using #webscraping
HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 92 - Loop: 242 - Rank min: 80 - Author rank: 80
 
Image/Photo

Alles soll beobachtbar werden


Kein Licht im Darknet und noch weniger Postgeheimnis

Vor einem Monat hat ein Staatssekretär des Bundesinnenministeriums dem Darknet „keinen legitimen Nutzen“ in „einer freien, offenen Demokratie“ attestiert. Vielleicht hätte er zuvor mal mit Hillary Clinton sprechen sollen, die als Außenministerin der USA die Entwickler des Tor Netzwerks mit einigen Millionen an Forschungsgeldern versorgt hatte. In den USA war man der Meinung, dass unzensierte Information und anonyme Kommunikation für Menschen in China und im Iran einen Wert an sich darstellen - oder zumindest für die USA. Die Menschen in der Türkei, denen im letzten Jahr mehrfach Twitter abgestellt wurde, hatte sie damals nicht im Blick, wie auch Edward Snowden, Wikileaks und andere Whistleblower in den USA.

Peter Schaar, der ehemalige Bundesdatenschutzbeauftragte, stellte auf der Veranstaltung vom Verbraucherministerium zum EU Datenschutztag Ende Januar u.a. sehr richtig fest:
  • Es gibt in Deutschland ein Recht auf Anonymität.
  • Die Gefahr von Meta-Daten ist immens.
Die erste Feststellung straft den oben genannten Staatssekretät Lügen, denn genau dieses Recht veteidigen die Betreiber der Knoten des Tor-Netzwerks. Der zweiten Feststellung widmen wir uns weiter unten beim Schlachtefest des Postgeheimnisses.

Der Bundesrat nun eine umfassende Gesetzesvorlage beschlossen, die Benutzer des Tor-Netzes, aber auch alle Freifunker und VPN-Betreiber unter Generalverdacht stellt. Danach soll es eine Straftat sein, eine „internetbasierte Leistung“ anzubieten, „deren Zugang und Erreichbarkeit durch besondere technische Vorkehrungen beschränkt“ ist. Wenn das die Formulierung im Gesetzestext gewesen wäre, würde es auch sämtliche VPN-basierte Intranets von Firmen für ihre Mitarbeiter betreffen. Deshalb wird ergänzt, dass diese "Leistung" ... "Möglichkeiten der Anonymisierung" bietet und damit wird das Gesetz nicht auf Tor beschränkt. Auch das Freifunk-Netz, dessen Router ein VPN nutzen, um eine Verbindung ins Internet herzustellen, anonymisiert seine Nutzer zwangsläufig. Firmen VPNs können sich da wieder juristisch ausklinken, da deren Mitarbeiter einen ihrer Person zugeordneten Zugang zum (Firmen-) VPN haben.

Halten wir also fest: Künftig soll es verboten sein Tor zu nutzen oder Knoten dazu zu betreiben, Freifunk Router über VPN anzubinden oder überhaupt anonym nutzbare VPNs zu nutzen oder anzubieten.

"Glücklicherweise" hat (die FDP von) NRW einen Zusatz zum Gesetzesvorschlag eingebracht, wonach solche Dienste nur dann strafbar sein sollen, wenn „deren Zweck oder Tätigkeit darauf ausgerichtet ist, die Begehung von rechtswidrigen Taten im Sinne von Satz 2 zu ermöglichen oder zu fördern“ - und dann folgt in Satz 2 eine lange Liste allen Böses dieser Welt.

Wenn das zum Gesetz werden würde, können wir sicher sein, dass in x Jahren auch HTTPS unter Strafe gestellt wird, weil es die (möglicherweise strafbaren) Inhalte der Kommunikation verschleiert.

Kommen wir jedoch auf das Postgeheimnis (Grundgesetz Artikel 10) zurück. Auf die Initiative Bayerns hin wurde in den Gesetzesvorschlag eine bedenkliche Änderung am Postgeheimnis eingebracht und vom Bundesrat mitbeschlossen. Künftig sollen "Behörden" umfangreichen Zugriff auf archivierte Daten von Postdienstleistern erhalten und das auch ausdrücklich rückwirkend. Nebenbei, was sagen eigentlich Juristen zur rückwirkenden Gültigkeit von Gesetzen?

"Archivierte Daten von Postdienstleistern" sind mehr als die Unterschriften zur Bestätigung über den Erhalt eines Einschreibens! Sämtliche Sortiervorgänge der Post, die früher von (vergesslichen) Menschen in den Postämtern oder den Post- und Paketwagen der Bundesbahn über Nacht durchgeführt wurden, werden heute von Computern durchgeführt, die über ihre Arbeit genaue Logdateien anlegen können. Das sind auch Meta-Daten auf die Peter Schaar hinweisen wollte.

Damit kommt diesem Gesetzesvorschlag eine viel höhere Brisanz zu als der (um 2010 glücklicherweise gescheiterten) Idee der polnischen Post eine Vorratsdatenspeicherung für Briefsendungen einzuführen - denn genau das steckt im Ergebnis dahinter.

Mehr dazu bei https://www.heise.de/ct/artikel/Generalverdacht-Gesetzesvorlage-zu-Darknet-Dienste-Verbot-und-Postgeheimnis-4349583.html
und https://www.aktion-freiheitstattangst.org/de/articles/6845-20190407-alles-soll-beobachtbar-werden.htm

#Grundrechte #Menschenrechte #Postgeheimnis #Darknet #Tor #VPN #Zensur #Transparenz #GGArt.10 #Lauschangriff #Überwachung #Vorratsdatenspeicherung #Videoüberwachung #Rasterfahndung #Datenbanken #Freizügigkeit #Unschuldsvermutung #Verhaltensänderung #Bundesrat
 

Tor Browser 8.5


HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19979713
Posted by rahiel (karma: 1096)
Post stats: Points: 147 - Comments: 70 - 2019-05-22T10:38:59Z

\#HackerNews #browser #tor
HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 121 - Loop: 327 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 161
 

Tor Browser disabled NoScript, but can't update


HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19832792
Posted by lichtenberger (karma: 643)
Post stats: Points: 96 - Comments: 73 - 2019-05-05T13:49:47Z

\#HackerNews #browser #but #cant #disabled #noscript #tor #update
HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 88 - Loop: 87 - Rank min: 80 - Author rank: 36
 
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