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"When it comes to the extensive and invasive use of biometric data, the USA is one of the worst offenders in the world, faring only slightly better than China."

"According to research conducted by Comparitech, which rated 50 countries according to how, where and why biometrics were taken and how they are stored, the US ranked as the fourth worst country. Topping the list is China, followed by Malaysia and Pakistan."

"While Comparitech did not look at every country in the world, its study did compare 50 of them. To give a country a rating out of 25, each was rated out of five in four categories (storage, CCTV, workplace, and visas) according to how invasive and pervasive and the collection and use of biometrics is."

#privacy #cybersecurity #biometrics #surveillance
The US shows a 'concerning lack of regard for the privacy of people's biometric data'
 
"Trackers are hiding in nearly every corner of today’s Internet, which is to say nearly every corner of modern life. The average web page shares data with dozens of third-parties. The average mobile app does the same, and many apps collect highly sensitive information like location and call records even when they’re not in use. Tracking also reaches into the physical world. Shopping centers use automatic license-plate readers to track traffic through their parking lots, then share that data with law enforcement. Businesses, concert organizers, and political campaigns use Bluetooth and WiFi beacons to perform passive monitoring of people in their area. Retail stores use face recognition to identify customers, screen for theft, and deliver targeted ads."

"The tech companies, data brokers, and advertisers behind this surveillance, and the technology that drives it, are largely invisible to the average user. Corporations have built a hall of one-way mirrors: from the inside, you can see only apps, web pages, ads, and yourself reflected by social media. But in the shadows behind the glass, trackers quietly take notes on nearly everything you do. These trackers are not omniscient, but they are widespread and indiscriminate. The data they collect and derive is not perfect, but it is nevertheless extremely sensitive."

"This paper will focus on corporate 'third-party' tracking: the collection of personal information by companies that users don’t intend to interact with. It will shed light on the technical methods and business practices behind third-party tracking. For journalists, policy makers, and concerned consumers, we hope this paper will demystify the fundamentals of third-party tracking, explain the scope of the problem, and suggest ways for users and legislation to fight back against the status quo."

#surveillance #privacy
 
"Ring, Amazon’s crimefighting surveillance camera division, has crafted plans to use facial recognition software and its ever-expanding network of home security cameras to create AI-enabled neighborhood “watch lists,” according to internal documents reviewed by The Intercept."

"The planning materials envision a seamless system whereby a Ring owner would be automatically alerted when an individual deemed 'suspicious' was captured in their camera’s frame, something described as a 'suspicious activity prompt'."

"It’s unclear who would have access to these neighborhood watch lists, if implemented, or how exactly they would be compiled, but the documents refer repeatedly to law enforcement, and Ring has forged partnerships with police departments throughout the U.S., raising the possibility that the lists could be used to aid local authorities. The documents indicate that the lists would be available in Ring’s Neighbors app, through which Ring camera owners discuss potential porch and garage security threats with others nearby."

#AmazonRing #privacy #surveillance #facialrecognition
 

From Permanent Record by Edward Snowden pgs. 191-193


"Our mission was pretty much appliance-based on this one afternoon I'm recalling - we were in Best Buy. Having settled on a new microwave, we were checking out, on Lindsay'a healthful insistence, a display of blenders. She had her phone out and was in the midst of researching which of the ten or so devices had the best reviews, when I found myself wandering over to the computer department at the far end of the store.

But along the way I stopped. There, at the edge of the kitchenware section, ensconced atop a brightly decorated and lit elevated platform, was a shiny new refrigerator. Rather, it was a 'Smart-fridge' which was being advertised as 'Internet-equipped.'

This, plain and simple, blew my mind.

A salesperson approached, interpreting my stupefaction as interest - "It's amazing, isn't it?" - and proceeded to demonstrate a few of the features. A screen was embedded in the door of the fridge, and next to the door was a tiny stylus, which allowed you to scribble messages. If you didn't want to scribble, you could record audio and video memos. You could also use the screen as your regular computer, because the refrigerator had Wi-Fi. You could check your email, or check your calendar. You could watch YouTube clips, or listen to MP3s. You could even make phone calls. I had to restrain myself from keying in Lindsay's number and saying from across the floor, "I'm calling you from a fridge."

Beyond that, the salesperson continued, the fridge's computer kept track of internal temperature, and, through scanning barcodes, the freshness of your food. It provided nutritional information and suggested recipes. I think the price was over $9,ooo. "Delivery included," the salesperson said.

I remember driving home in a confused silence. This wasn't quite the stunning moonshot tech-future we'd been promised. I was convinced the only reason the thing was Internet- equipped was so that it could report back to its manufacturer about its owner's usage and about any other household data that was obtainable. The manufacturer, in turn, would monetize that data by selling it. And we were supposed to pay for the privilege.

I wondered what the point was of my getting so worked up over government surveillance if my friends, neighbours, and fellow citizens were more than happy to invite corporate surveillance into their homes, allowing themselves to be tracked while browsing in their pantries as efficiently as if they were browsing the Web. It would be another half decade before the domotics revolution, before 'virtual assistants' like Amazon Echo and Google Home were welcomed into bedroom and placed proudly on nightstands to record and transmit all activity within range, to log all habits and preferences (not to mention fetishes and kinks), which would then be developed into advertising algorithms and converted into cash. The data we generate just by living - or just by letting ourselves be surveilled while living - would enrich private enterprise and impoverish our private existence in equal measure. If government surveillance was having the effect of turning the citizen into a subject, at the mercy of state power, then corporate surveillance was turning the consumer into a product, which corporations sold to other corporations, data brokers and advertisers.

Meanwhile, it felt as if every major tech company, including Dell, was rolling out new civilian versions of what I was working on for the CIA: a cloud. (In fact, Dell had even tried four years previously to trademark the term 'cloud-computing' but was denied). I was amazed at how willingly people were signing up, so excited at the prospect of their photos and videos and music and e-books being universally backed up and available that they never gave much thought as to why such uber-sophisticated and convenient storage solution was being offered to them for 'free' or for 'cheap' in the first place.

I don't think I'd ever seen such a concept be so uniformly bought into on every side. 'The cloud' was as effective a sales term for Dell to sell to the CIA as it was for Amazon and Apple and Google to sell to their users. I can still close my eyes and hear Cliff some CIA suit about how "with the cloud, you'll be able to push security updates across agency computers world-wide," or "when the cloud's up and running, the agency will be able to track who has read what file world-wide." The cloud was white and fluffy and peaceful, floating high above the fray. Though many clouds make a stormy sky, a single cloud provided a benevolent bit of shade. It was protective. I think it made everyone think of heaven. "
dl #EdwardSnowden #CIA #cloud #comuting #surveillance #books at
 

From Permanent Record by Edward Snowden pgs. 191-193


"Our mission was pretty much appliance-based on this one afternoon I'm recalling - we were in Best Buy. Having settled on a new microwave, we were checking out, on Lindsay'a healthful insistence, a display of blenders. She had her phone out and was in the midst of researching which of the ten or so devices had the best reviews, when I found myself wandering over to the computer department at the far end of the store.

But along the way I stopped. There, at the edge of the kitchenware section, ensconced atop a brightly decorated and lit elevated platform, was a shiny new refrigerator. Rather, it was a 'Smart-fridge' which was being advertised as 'Internet-equipped.'

This, plain and simple, blew my mind.

A salesperson approached, interpreting my stupefaction as interest - "It's amazing, isn't it?" - and proceeded to demonstrate a few of the features. A screen was embedded in the door of the fridge, and next to the door was a tiny stylus, which allowed you to scribble messages. If you didn't want to scribble, you could record audio and video memos. You could also use the screen as your regular computer, because the refrigerator had Wi-Fi. You could check your email, or check your calendar. You could watch YouTube clips, or listen to MP3s. You could even make phone calls. I had to restrain myself from keying in Lindsay's number and saying from across the floor, "I'm calling you from a fridge."

Beyond that, the salesperson continued, the fridge's computer kept track of internal temperature, and, through scanning barcodes, the freshness of your food. It provided nutritional information and suggested recipes. I think the price was over $9,ooo. "Delivery included," the salesperson said.

I remember driving home in a confused silence. This wasn't quite the stunning moonshot tech-future we'd been promised. I was convinced the only reason the thing was Internet- equipped was so that it could report back to its manufacturer about its owner's usage and about any other household data that was obtainable. The manufacturer, in turn, would monetize that data by selling it. And we were supposed to pay for the privilege.

I wondered what the point was of my getting so worked up over government surveillance if my friends, neighbours, and fellow citizens were more than happy to invite corporate surveillance into their homes, allowing themselves to be tracked while browsing in their pantries as efficiently as if they were browsing the Web. It would be another half decade before the domotics revolution, before 'virtual assistants' like Amazon Echo and Google Home were welcomed into bedroom and placed proudly on nightstands to record and transmit all activity within range, to log all habits and preferences (not to mention fetishes and kinks), which would then be developed into advertising algorithms and converted into cash. The data we generate just by living - or just by letting ourselves be surveilled while living - would enrich private enterprise and impoverish our private existence in equal measure. If government surveillance was having the effect of turning the citizen into a subject, at the mercy of state power, then corporate surveillance was turning the consumer into a product, which corporations sold to other corporations, data brokers and advertisers.

Meanwhile, it felt as if every major tech company, including Dell, was rolling out new civilian versions of what I was working on for the CIA: a cloud. (In fact, Dell had even tried four years previously to trademark the term 'cloud-computing' but was denied). I was amazed at how willingly people were signing up, so excited at the prospect of their photos and videos and music and e-books being universally backed up and available that they never gave much thought as to why such uber-sophisticated and convenient storage solution was being offered to them for 'free' or for 'cheap' in the first place.

I don't think I'd ever seen such a concept be so uniformly bought into on every side. 'The cloud' was as effective a sales term for Dell to sell to the CIA as it was for Amazon and Apple and Google to sell to their users. I can still close my eyes and hear Cliff some CIA suit about how "with the cloud, you'll be able to push security updates across agency computers world-wide," or "when the cloud's up and running, the agency will be able to track who has read what file world-wide." The cloud was white and fluffy and peaceful, floating high above the fray. Though many clouds make a stormy sky, a single cloud provided a benevolent bit of shade. It was protective. I think it made everyone think of heaven. "
dl #EdwardSnowden #CIA #cloud #comuting #surveillance #books at
 
" After news broke that Peter Thiel and Mark Zuckerberg had consumed a secret White House dinner with Donald Trump, Elizabeth Warren characterised it as part of Facebook's 'charm offensive with Republican lawmakers' in response to her call to use antitrust law to break up Facebook, calling the move 'corruption, plain and simple...how the government keeps working for giant corporations and the wealthy and well-connected'."

#SocialMedia #surveillance #privacy
Elizabeth Warren calls Zuck and Thiel's secret Trump White House dinner "corrupt"
 
"US Senator Edward Markey yesterday revealed the results of a months-long investigation into Amazon‘s Ring camera-doorbells and the company’s relationship with law enforcement. The Senator’s press team dubbed the findings 'alarming' and called the company’s policies 'an open door for privacy and civil liberty violations'."

"The press release [...] describes several key findings indicating that Amazon executives took little or no action to prevent or discourage misuse of camera footage by law enforcement, even going so far as to urge officers to 'to take steps that will increase rates of video sharing' and approaching customers with targeted language intended to convince them to give footage to law enforcement."

#Amazon #Ring #privacy #surveillance
 
Yet another reason why I am not a Democrat... they always get this wrong...

Democrats in Congress reauthorize Patriot Act, again

"Kudos to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the 9 other Democrats for voting against it!"

#PatriotAct #surveillance
Democrats in Congress reauthorize Patriot Act, again
 

Senators ask Zuckerberg to explain Facebook location-tracking policies | CNBC

Sens. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., and Chris Coons, D-Del., have asked Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to explain how the company tracks users’ locations under restricted settings.
In a letter sent Tuesday, the senators say Zuckerberg should address concerns with the location-tracking policy announced in response to privacy updates made in the latest versions of Apple and Google’s mobile operating systems.
In a September post explaining the policy, Facebook said it can determine users’ locations from factors like their internet connection, even if they have their location settings restricted.
#technology #internet #Facebook #privacy #security #surveillance
 
When it comes to privacy, these guys are not your friends.

Facebook, Google Fund Nonprofits Shaping Federal Privacy Debate

"Few companies have more riding on proposed privacy legislation than Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. To try to steer the bill their way, the giant advertising technology companies spend millions of dollars to lobby each year, a fact confirmed by government filings."

"Not so well-documented is spending to support highly influential think tanks and public interest groups that are helping shape the privacy debate, ostensibly as independent observers."

"Bloomberg Law examined seven prominent nonprofit think tanks that work on privacy issues that received a total of $1.5 million over a 18-month period ending Dec. 31, 2018. The groups included such organizations as the Center for Democracy and Technology, the Future of Privacy Forum and the Brookings Institution. The actual total is undoubtedly much higher—exact totals for contributions were difficult to pin down."

#privacy #surveillance
 
"Justice Department officials have long pushed for some sort of backdoor to permit warranted surveillance and searches of encrypted communications. Recently, that push has been taken international with Attorney General William Barr and his counterparts from the United Kingdom and Australia making an open plea to Facebook to delay plans to use end-to-end encryption across all the company's messaging tools."

"Now, the Department of Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigations are attempting to get an even larger international consensus on banning end-to-end encryption by way of a draft resolution authored by officials at the FBI for the International Criminal Police Organization's 37th Meeting of the INTERPOL Specialists Group on Crimes against Children. The event took place from November 12 to November 15 at INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon, France."

"A draft of the resolution viewed by Ars Technica stated that INTERPOL would 'strongly urge providers of technology services to allow for lawful access to encrypted data enabled or facilitated by their systems' in the interest of fighting child sexual exploitation. Currently, it is not clear whether Interpol will ultimately issue a statement."

#encryption #privacy #surveillance
 
"Rising levels of political disinformation and government surveillance are making the internet less free in the U.S., according to a new report by Freedom House, a democracy and human rights research group."

"The big picture: Internet freedom is in decline around the world, according to the report, as governments increasingly use social media to monitor their citizens and spread disinformation at home and overseas."

#Internet #FreedomOfExpression #surveillance #privacy
 
"Customers and users who thought their personal info was shielded from law enforcement probing are now finding out these protections can be undermined by a warrant targeting anyone that matches a certain DNA profile."

#DNA #privacy #surveillance #biometrics #fourthamendment
 
"There can be no accountability if there is no transparency."

#ACLU #FBI #FacialRecognition #biometrics #privacy #surveillance
 

WhatsApp 'hack' is serious rights violation, say alleged victims | The Guardian

More than a dozen pro-democracy activists, journalists and academics have spoken out after WhatsApp privately warned them they had allegedly been the victims of cyber-attacks designed to secretly infiltrate their mobile phones.

The individuals received alerts saying they were among more than 100 human rights campaigners whose phones were believed to have been hacked using malware sold by NSO Group, an Israeli cyberweapons company.
#technology #surveillance #security #privacy
 
"Earlier this week, NBC News had quite a story about a facial recognition tech company in Israel, named AnyVision, that is being used by the Israeli military to conduct surveillance on Palestinians in the West Bank. Much of the article focuses on the fact that Microsoft invested in AnyVision, at a time when Microsoft claims it's been taking the moral high ground and unwilling to work on more nefarious uses of things like facial recognition technology. The story hits on a bunch of different points that we regularly cover at Techdirt, from misuses of facial recognition to large company hypocrisy. But we're writing about it for a different reason: the way that AnyVision's CEO reacted upon being contacted by NBC reporters..."

#AnyVision #facialrecognition #Palestine #surveillance #oppression
 
Soviet Australia...?

Australia Proposes Face Scans for Watching Online Pornography

"The Australian government has proposed using a facial recognition system it is developing to verify that people who seek to watch pornography online are of legal age."

"Current law in Australia does not prohibit minors from viewing pornography. But the federal government is considering proposals that would require people to prove their age before watching the material."

"Under the proposal from the Department of Home Affairs, a computer user’s face would be matched to images from official identity documents. It does not say how the user would submit a facial image at the beginning of each online session."

#Australia #pornography #privacy #surveillance
 
No. Just No.

Republicans propose mass student surveillance plan to prevent shootings

"Senate Republicans have a new plan for preventing mass shootings: require public schools to use surveillance technology to monitor students’ online behavior for signs of violence or self-harm."

"A new Republican bill that claims 'to help prevent mass shootings' includes no new gun control measures. Instead, Republican lawmakers are supporting a huge, federally mandated boost to America’s growing school surveillance industry."

"Millions of American students, across thousands of school districts, are already being monitored by tech companies that scan everything they write in school emails, chats and shared documents, looking for signs of suicidal thoughts or plans for a school shooting. This surveillance technology doesn’t turn off when the school day is over: anything students type in official school accounts is monitored 24 hours a day, whether they are in their classrooms or their bedrooms."

"There is still no research evidence that demonstrates whether or not online monitoring of schoolchildren actually works to prevent violence."

#GOP #surveillance #gunviolence
 
" Internet giant Comcast is lobbying U.S. lawmakers against plans to encrypt web traffic that would make it harder for internet service providers (ISPs) to determine your browsing history, according to a lobbying presentation obtained by Motherboard."

"The plan, which Google intends to implement soon, would enforce the encryption of DNS data made using Chrome, meaning the sites you visit. Privacy activists have praised Google's move. But ISPs are pushing back as part of a wider lobbying effort against encrypted DNS, according to the presentation. Technologists and activists say this encryption would make it harder for ISPs to leverage data for things such as targeted advertising, as well as block some forms of censorship by authoritarian regimes."

#privacy #encryption #surveillance
 

Under digital surveillance: how American schools spy on millions of kids | The Guardian

Fueled by fears of school shootings, the market has grown rapidly for technologies that monitor students through official school emails and chats
#technology #education #privacy #security #surveillance
 
"FBI’s repeated and unjustified searches of Americans’ information contained in massive databases of communications collected using the government’s #Section702 mass #surveillance program."
 
"FBI’s repeated and unjustified searches of Americans’ information contained in massive databases of communications collected using the government’s #Section702 mass #surveillance program."
 

Is Amazon Watching You? Cloud Cam Footage Reviewed By Humans | Bloomberg

In a promotional video, Amazon.com Inc. says its Cloud Cam home security camera provides “everything you need to monitor your home, day or night.” In fact, the artificially intelligent device requires help from a squad of invisible employees.

Dozens of Amazon workers based in India and Romania review select clips captured by Cloud Cam, according to five people who have worked on the program or have direct knowledge of it. Those video snippets are then used to train the AI algorithms to do a better job distinguishing between a real threat (a home invader) and a false alarm (the cat jumping on the sofa).
#technology #HomeSecurity #webcam #surveillance #security #privacy #Amazon
 
Creeping fascism.

Revealed: anti-terror center helped police track environmental activists

"A federally sponsored anti-terrorism fusion center in Oregon assisted a taskforce monitoring protest groups organizing against a fossil fuel infrastructure project in the state, according to documents obtained by the Guardian."

"The Oregon Titan Fusion Center – part of a network set up to monitor terrorist activities – disseminated information gathered by that taskforce, and shared information provided by private security attached to the gas project with some of the task force members."

"Observers, including the American Civil Liberties Union, argue these efforts break Oregon law."

#surveillance #firstamendment #fourthamendment #oilandgas #climatechange #environment

 
I do not use WhatsApp, for what it's worth, nor any other software owned or operated by Facebook. (I recommend Signal instead of WhatsApp.)

Facebook, WhatsApp Will Have to Share Messages With U.K. Police

"Social media platforms based in the U.S. including Facebook and WhatsApp will be forced to share users’ encrypted messages with British police under a new treaty between the two countries, according to a person familiar with the matter."

"The accord, which is set to be signed by next month, will compel social media firms to share information to support investigations into individuals suspected of serious criminal offenses including terrorism and pedophilia, the person said."

#Facebook #WhatsApp #surveillance #privacy
 
"The F.B.I. has used secret subpoenas to obtain personal data from far more companies than previously disclosed, newly released documents show."

"The requests, which the F.B.I. says are critical to its counterterrorism efforts, have raised privacy concerns for years but have been associated mainly with tech companies. Now, records show how far beyond Silicon Valley the practice extends — encompassing scores of banks, credit agencies, cellphone carriers and even universities."

"The demands can scoop up a variety of information, including usernames, locations, IP addresses and records of purchases. They don’t require a judge’s approval and usually come with a gag order, leaving them shrouded in secrecy. Fewer than 20 entities, most of them tech companies, have ever revealed that they’ve received the subpoenas, known as national security letters."

"The documents, obtained by the Electronic Frontier Foundation through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit and shared with The New York Times, shed light on the scope of the demands — more than 120 companies and other entities were included in the filing — and raise questions about the effectiveness of a 2015 law that was intended to increase transparency around them."

#FBI #privacy #NSL #FourthAmendment #surveillance

The New York Times: Secret F.B.I. Subpoenas Scoop Up Personal Data From Scores of Companies (By Jennifer Valentino-DeVries)

 
"A federal judge ruled on Wednesday that a federal government database that compiles people deemed to be 'known or suspected terrorists' violates the rights of American citizens who are on the watchlist, calling into question the constitutionality of a major tool the F.B.I. and the Department of Homeland Security use for screening potential terrorism suspects."

"Being on the watchlist can restrict people from traveling or entering the country, subject them to greater scrutiny at airports and by the police, and deny them government benefits and contracts. In a 32-page opinion, Judge Anthony J. Trenga of United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia said the standard for inclusion in the database was too vague."

#surveillance
 

Amazon's doorbell camera Ring is working with police – and controlling what they say | The Guardian

Ring, Amazon’s camera-connected smart doorbell company, has cameras watching hundreds of thousands of doorsteps across the US. It’s also keeping an eye on what local police say online.

Records obtained through an information request show how Ring uses corporate partnerships to shape the communications of police departments it collaborates with, directing the departments’ press releases, social media posts and comments on public posts.
#technology #Ring #security #surveillance
 
"The Department of Justice wants access to encrypted consumer devices, but promises not to infiltrate business products or affect critical infrastructure. Yet that's not possible, because there is no longer any difference between those categories of devices. Consumer devices are critical infrastructure. They affect national security. And it would be foolish to weaken them, even at the request of law enforcement."

#cybersecurity #encryption #surveillance
 
"Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has called for a complete ban on police use of facial recognition, as part of his campaign’s broader plan for criminal justice reform. If elected president, Sanders specifically pledges to 'ban the use of facial recognition software for policing'. The plan also calls for ending programs that provide military equipment to local police and establishing federal standards for the use of body cameras."

"Sanders is the first presidential candidate to call for an outright ban on police use of facial recognition, although a number of other Democratic candidates have expressed concerns about how the technology is being used. Last year, Kamala Harris and Cory Booker joined with other senators in a letter to the Federal Trade Commission, raising concerns about racial bias in facial recognition algorithms."

#Bernie2020 #facialrecognition #surveillance #privacy
 

Wanna break free from #Google?


Here are some recommendations:
What did I missed? What is you favourite alternative? and why?
#freesoftware #foss #floss #open-source #opensource #linux #gnu-linux #fdroid #technoethical #mobile #software #privacy #surveillance #freedom
 

Wanna break free from #Google?


Here are some recommendations:
What did I missed? What is you favourite alternative? and why?
#freesoftware #foss #floss #open-source #opensource #linux #gnu-linux #fdroid #technoethical #mobile #software #privacy #surveillance #freedom
 

Privacy campaigners warn of UK facial recognition 'epidemic' | The Guardian

Privacy campaigners have warned of an “epidemic” of facial recognition use in shopping centres, museums, conference centres and other private spaces around the UK
We're so used to CCTV that I bet many people don't know the difference.

#technology #surveillance #FacialRecognition
 
"The New York Police Department has taken DNA samples from people convicted of crimes, as well as from people who are only arrested or sometimes simply questioned. The practice has exposed the Police Department to scrutiny over how the genetic material is collected and whether privacy rights are being violated, civil liberties lawyers said."

"A growing number of law enforcement agencies throughout the country — including police departments in Connecticut, California and Maryland — have amassed genetic databases that operate by their own rules, outside of state and federal guidelines, which tend to be far more strict."

"According to a 2013 survey, 30 states and the federal government permitted the analysis of DNA samples collected from individuals who are arrested or charged, but not convicted, of certain crimes. These databases generally did not include low-level offenders."

"New York State law requires a conviction before someone’s DNA can be included in the state-operated DNA databank. But databases built by local authorities are not subject to the state rules."

#surveillance #privacy #DNA #InformedConsent

The New York Times: N.Y.P.D. Detectives Gave a Boy, 12, a Soda. He Landed in a DNA Database. (By JAN RANSOM and ASHLEY SOUTHALL)

 
"Breaking a long silence about a high-profile National Security Agency program that sifts records of Americans’ telephone calls and text messages in search of terrorists, the Trump administration on Thursday acknowledged for the first time that the system has been indefinitely shut down — but asked Congress to extend its legal basis anyway."

"In a letter to Congress delivered on Thursday and obtained by The New York Times, the administration urged lawmakers to make permanent the legal authority for the National Security Agency to gain access to logs of Americans’ domestic communications, the USA Freedom Act. The law, enacted after the intelligence contractor Edward J. Snowden revealed the existence of the program in 2013, is set to expire in December, but the Trump administration wants it made permanent."

#NSA #surveillance #FourthAmendment #privacy
 
"One in five California lawmakers were mistaken for convicted criminals in an experiment testing the reliability of facial-recognition software in identifying potentially dangerous suspects. The Los Angeles Times reports that local assemblyman Phil Ting called for the experiment as part of a bill to ban the use of such technology by police and law-enforcement agencies. The experiment incorrectly matched his face to a convicted felon, which he argues could put innocent people in jeopardy if police mistakenly identify them as dangerous criminals. 'The software clearly is not ready for use in a law-enforcement capacity', Ting said. 'These mistakes, we can kind of chuckle at it, but if you get arrested and it’s on your record, it can be hard to get housing, get a job. It has real impacts'. Proponents of the technology argue that it is useful in searching for lost children or elderly people in large group situations."

#facialrecognition #biometrics #surveillance #privacy
 
Monsanto/Bayer Evil Corp.

Monsanto ran a psy-ops war-room to discredit journalists and spy on Neil Young

" Monsanto ran a 'fusion center' (a term borrowed from law-enforcement counter-terrorism operations) that spied on activists and journalists who were investigating the safety of its products, notably the link between its 'Round Up' pesticides and cancers."

"The Guardian reports on internal records that it obtained from the center's operations from 2015-2017, which document the company's 'multi-pronged' plan to discredit Reuters journalist Carey Gillam ahead of the publication of Whitewash: The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science, her book on the subject, in which the company drafted 'third party talking points' to be fed to people who were not publicly associated with the company, who could then repeat the points in the press as though they had come from disinterested parties."

"The company also bought Google ads targeted against Gillam's name that redirected searchers to smear pages."

#Monsanto #Bayer #evil #surveillance #propaganda
Monsanto ran a psy-ops war-room to discredit journalists and spy on Neil Young
 

#Amazon says #US #government demands for customer #data went up | TechCrunch


https://techcrunch.com/2019/08/01/amazon-prism-transparency-data/

#Surveillance
Amazon says US government demands for customer data went up
 
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