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Items tagged with: sculpture

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#Sculpture. (4 photos)
Statue of Jack the Pardoned Turkey
Hartford, Connecticut
This sculpture commemorates the first instance of an American president pardoning a turkey.

THOUGH THE MODERN TRADITION OF an American president officially pardoning a turkey at Thanksgiving began with George H. W. Bush in 1989, the idea is believed to have originated with Abraham Lincoln.

Lincoln’s pardoned turkey was actually gifted to the First Family in 1863, just a month after the president declared Thanksgiving a national holiday. Though meant to be Christmas dinner that year, the turkey was quickly adopted by Tad Lincoln, the president’s 10-year-old son. Tad named the bird Jack and trained it to follow him all over the White House. When the time came to slaughter and eat Jack, Tad begged his father to spare the creature’s life. Lincoln, ever indulgent of his youngest child, wrote a note “pardoning” Jack and gave it to Tad, who showed it to the head chef, thus granting a reprieve for the beloved pet.

In 2005, as part of a riverfront revitalization effort in downtown Hartford, the Lincoln Financial Group sponsored 16 sculptures along the Connecticut River. The series commemorates the life and achievements of the insurance and investment company’s namesake. Among the sculptures is a stylized depiction of Jack designed by New York artist Philip Grausman.

Know Before You Go
The Lincoln sculpture walk begins at Riverside Park in Hartford. Park in the parking lot next to the Community Boathouse. The sculpture of Jack is on the sidewalk along the river just before the bridge.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/statue-of-jack-the-pardoned-turkey
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (4 photos)
Statue of Jack the Pardoned Turkey
Hartford, Connecticut
This sculpture commemorates the first instance of an American president pardoning a turkey.

THOUGH THE MODERN TRADITION OF an American president officially pardoning a turkey at Thanksgiving began with George H. W. Bush in 1989, the idea is believed to have originated with Abraham Lincoln.

Lincoln’s pardoned turkey was actually gifted to the First Family in 1863, just a month after the president declared Thanksgiving a national holiday. Though meant to be Christmas dinner that year, the turkey was quickly adopted by Tad Lincoln, the president’s 10-year-old son. Tad named the bird Jack and trained it to follow him all over the White House. When the time came to slaughter and eat Jack, Tad begged his father to spare the creature’s life. Lincoln, ever indulgent of his youngest child, wrote a note “pardoning” Jack and gave it to Tad, who showed it to the head chef, thus granting a reprieve for the beloved pet.

In 2005, as part of a riverfront revitalization effort in downtown Hartford, the Lincoln Financial Group sponsored 16 sculptures along the Connecticut River. The series commemorates the life and achievements of the insurance and investment company’s namesake. Among the sculptures is a stylized depiction of Jack designed by New York artist Philip Grausman.

Know Before You Go
The Lincoln sculpture walk begins at Riverside Park in Hartford. Park in the parking lot next to the Community Boathouse. The sculpture of Jack is on the sidewalk along the river just before the bridge.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/statue-of-jack-the-pardoned-turkey
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (3 photos)
'Giganticus Headicus'
Kingman, Arizona
A tribute to the statues of Easter Island along Route 66.

“GIGANTICUS HEADICUS,” IS A GIANT, tiki-style head constructed in 2004 by area artist Gregg Arnold. The statue is 14 feet tall and crafted from cement, chicken wire, and styrofoam. This unique work of art can be found in Antares Point near Kingman, Arizona, along Route 66. It’s adjacent to the former Kozy Corner Trailer Park.

The main A-frame building where the head sits was originally a location for Nickerson Farms, a popular chain of restaurants/gift shops that existed between 1960 and early 1980. It was later repurposed into a gift shop that featured some Route 66 memorabilia and “Giganticus Headicus” themed gifts until it closed in 2020. There are also several old cars on the property and vintage gas pumps.

While the storefront is vacant as of 2021, the site is set to reopen as a gift shop and sculpture garden featuring more of Arnold’s pieces in the near future.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/giganticus-headicus
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (3 photos)
'Giganticus Headicus'
Kingman, Arizona
A tribute to the statues of Easter Island along Route 66.

“GIGANTICUS HEADICUS,” IS A GIANT, tiki-style head constructed in 2004 by area artist Gregg Arnold. The statue is 14 feet tall and crafted from cement, chicken wire, and styrofoam. This unique work of art can be found in Antares Point near Kingman, Arizona, along Route 66. It’s adjacent to the former Kozy Corner Trailer Park.

The main A-frame building where the head sits was originally a location for Nickerson Farms, a popular chain of restaurants/gift shops that existed between 1960 and early 1980. It was later repurposed into a gift shop that featured some Route 66 memorabilia and “Giganticus Headicus” themed gifts until it closed in 2020. There are also several old cars on the property and vintage gas pumps.

While the storefront is vacant as of 2021, the site is set to reopen as a gift shop and sculpture garden featuring more of Arnold’s pieces in the near future.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/giganticus-headicus
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (3 photos)
'Oma maa mansikka'
Helsinki, Finland
This ten-ton fruit sculpture celebrates the Finland homeland.

STANDING PROUDLY OUTSIDE AN EXTENSION to the Finnish Parliament building is an oversized steel strawberry patch.

In 2005, the Finnish Parliament commissioned six pieces of artwork to decorate the new Finnish Parliament Annex, also known as “Little Parliament.” Out of 1,719 competition entries, this design by Finnish artist Jukka Lehtinen was chosen as the only one visible to the public outside of the building. It is located in front of the annex next to a pool.

The planting basin that the sculpture is mounted in has wild strawberries growing around the sculpture’s base, contrasting the fragile nature of natural strawberries with the robust welded metalwork of the oversized strawberries of the sculpture.

The piece is named “Oma maa mansikka.“ The name derives from a well-known Finnish expression meaning “my land’s a strawberry, other land’s a blueberry.” Which is a metaphor that symbolizes Finnish pride for their homeland.

The occurrence of wild strawberries growing on land has for a long time in Finland been an indication of land ownership. Land management and agricultural practices of felling forests and burning the land to transform it into farmland creates good ground for wild strawberries.

The nine plant stem construction is a little over nine feet (3.5 meters) tall high and the two strawberries weigh over 200 pounds (100 kilograms) each. Strict calculations were made during the design and construction phase to ensure that the sculpture can withstand the elements.

The sculpture was made by the company Homlet Oy, who specializes in making steel structures.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/oma-maa-mansikka
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (3 photos)
'Oma maa mansikka'
Helsinki, Finland
This ten-ton fruit sculpture celebrates the Finland homeland.

STANDING PROUDLY OUTSIDE AN EXTENSION to the Finnish Parliament building is an oversized steel strawberry patch.

In 2005, the Finnish Parliament commissioned six pieces of artwork to decorate the new Finnish Parliament Annex, also known as “Little Parliament.” Out of 1,719 competition entries, this design by Finnish artist Jukka Lehtinen was chosen as the only one visible to the public outside of the building. It is located in front of the annex next to a pool.

The planting basin that the sculpture is mounted in has wild strawberries growing around the sculpture’s base, contrasting the fragile nature of natural strawberries with the robust welded metalwork of the oversized strawberries of the sculpture.

The piece is named “Oma maa mansikka.“ The name derives from a well-known Finnish expression meaning “my land’s a strawberry, other land’s a blueberry.” Which is a metaphor that symbolizes Finnish pride for their homeland.

The occurrence of wild strawberries growing on land has for a long time in Finland been an indication of land ownership. Land management and agricultural practices of felling forests and burning the land to transform it into farmland creates good ground for wild strawberries.

The nine plant stem construction is a little over nine feet (3.5 meters) tall high and the two strawberries weigh over 200 pounds (100 kilograms) each. Strict calculations were made during the design and construction phase to ensure that the sculpture can withstand the elements.

The sculpture was made by the company Homlet Oy, who specializes in making steel structures.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/oma-maa-mansikka
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (20 photos and 1 video)
Shimmering “Dragon Eggs” Reveal Faraway Landscapes Within Resin and Wood

https://mymodernmet.com/dragon-egg-sculptures-bens-worx/
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (20 photos and 1 video)
Shimmering “Dragon Eggs” Reveal Faraway Landscapes Within Resin and Wood

https://mymodernmet.com/dragon-egg-sculptures-bens-worx/
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (6 photos)
Bunnyhenge
Newport Beach, California
Fourteen curious and controversial white bunnies sit in a circle near Newport Beach City Hall.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/bunnyhenge
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (6 photos)
Bunnyhenge
Newport Beach, California
Fourteen curious and controversial white bunnies sit in a circle near Newport Beach City Hall.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/bunnyhenge
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (5 photos)
Beautiful Wax Sculptures Formed by Collaborating with Honeybees

https://mymodernmet.com/ren-ri-beeswax-sculptures/
 

Your pictures on the theme of 'sculpture' | BBC News

We asked our readers to send in their best pictures on the theme "sculpture". Here are some of the pictures we received from around the world.
#photography #sculpture
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (3 photos)
Rivelin Valley Chair
Sheffield, England
Seemingly straight out of a fairy tale, a steel chair sits on a tiny island only accessible by stepping stones.

ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF SHEFFIELD is the Rivelin Valley Trail, where beautiful riverside walks provide a mixture of nature and the industrial, lined as it is by ruins and remnants of various water wheels’ used to pump water to the mills and steelworks of the city in a bygone age.

Not far from the cafe and playground on the site sits a small island in the river, and on that island is a strange chair. Though it looks like it’s made of gnarled tree roots, closer examination reveals that the chair is actually sculpted from steel. It can only be accessed by a short trail of stepping stones from the river bank. The sculpture is the work of artist Jason Thomson, whose aim was to mix up the countryside and the industrial, while recognizing steel as the predominant industry in the city. It was created as part of the Second Nature project, which supports exploration of Sheffield’s woodlands.As it is, you’re likely to see families and passers by brave the sometimes partly submerged stepping stones, or wading out on warm days to the island to sit in the strange throne.

Know Before You Go
Please note the address is that of the nearby cafe. Follow the path keeping firstly the cafe and then the playground on your right hand side, over the bridge and after approximately 0.3 of a mile you’ll see the Island and the chair in the river. Continuing on you will discover many of the remnants from the Industrial Age water wheels and buildings, as well as some lovely woodland and riverside walks.
There is plenty of roadside parking on the main road near the entrance by the cafe.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/rivelin-valley-chair
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (3 photos)
Rivelin Valley Chair
Sheffield, England
Seemingly straight out of a fairy tale, a steel chair sits on a tiny island only accessible by stepping stones.

ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF SHEFFIELD is the Rivelin Valley Trail, where beautiful riverside walks provide a mixture of nature and the industrial, lined as it is by ruins and remnants of various water wheels’ used to pump water to the mills and steelworks of the city in a bygone age.

Not far from the cafe and playground on the site sits a small island in the river, and on that island is a strange chair. Though it looks like it’s made of gnarled tree roots, closer examination reveals that the chair is actually sculpted from steel. It can only be accessed by a short trail of stepping stones from the river bank. The sculpture is the work of artist Jason Thomson, whose aim was to mix up the countryside and the industrial, while recognizing steel as the predominant industry in the city. It was created as part of the Second Nature project, which supports exploration of Sheffield’s woodlands.As it is, you’re likely to see families and passers by brave the sometimes partly submerged stepping stones, or wading out on warm days to the island to sit in the strange throne.

Know Before You Go
Please note the address is that of the nearby cafe. Follow the path keeping firstly the cafe and then the playground on your right hand side, over the bridge and after approximately 0.3 of a mile you’ll see the Island and the chair in the river. Continuing on you will discover many of the remnants from the Industrial Age water wheels and buildings, as well as some lovely woodland and riverside walks.
There is plenty of roadside parking on the main road near the entrance by the cafe.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/rivelin-valley-chair
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (7 photos)
78-Year-Old Craft Master Transforms Wood Into Intricate Sculptures with Ancient Chinese Techniques

https://mymodernmet.com/deng-daohang-wood-carving/
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (7 photos)
78-Year-Old Craft Master Transforms Wood Into Intricate Sculptures with Ancient Chinese Techniques

https://mymodernmet.com/deng-daohang-wood-carving/
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (17 photos)
These Surreal Plant Sculptures Look Like Your Garden Came to Life as Humans

https://mymodernmet.com/emeric-chantier-plant-sculptures/
 
#Sculpture. (12 photos)
Artist Handcrafts Tiny Floating Islands With Enchanting Little Houses Embedded in Them
Artist Handcrafts Tiny Floating Islands With Enchanting Little Houses Embedded in Them
 
#Sculpture. (12 photos)
Artist Handcrafts Tiny Floating Islands With Enchanting Little Houses Embedded in Them
Artist Handcrafts Tiny Floating Islands With Enchanting Little Houses Embedded in Them
 
Image/Photo

Robin Wight


#art, #sculpture, #photographie, #Robin-Wight

Vous souhaiter à toutes et tous, un bon Nouvel An...
... dans quelques heures, en Nouvelle-Zélande, puis l’Australie, le Japon, la Russie, etc.
 
Image/Photo

Robin Wight


#art, #sculpture, #photographie, #Robin-Wight

Vous souhaiter à toutes et tous, un bon Nouvel An...
... dans quelques heures, en Nouvelle-Zélande, puis l’Australie, le Japon, la Russie, etc.
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (4 photos)
Giant Japanese Dragon Sculpture Made From Palm Tree Leaves and Wood

https://mymodernmet.com/japanese-dragon-sculpture/
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (1 photo and 1 video)
Artist Sculpts One-Of-A-Kind Electric Guitar Body from 1,200 Colored Pencils

https://mymodernmet.com/colored-pencils-custom-electric-guitar-flyjumper/
 
Image/Photo
#Sculpture. (15 photos)
Incredibly Patient Artist Hand-Carves a Delicate Chain from Pencil Lead

https://mymodernmet.com/pencil-lead-sculpture-chien-chu-lee/
 
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