rpg.pbem.online

Search

Items tagged with: books

Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #books, #bookshelf, #chopin, #linux, #lisp, and #reading.

The previous pod I was on had closed down many months ago (pod.thomasdalichow.de) and I'm only now getting set up again on Diaspora. I really missed the sense of community. These days I'm pretty busy during the day but when I have downtime in the evenings I like to play #tropico Right now I'm still on Tropico 5 (yes I realize that 6 has been out for awhile now!)
 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #books, #bookshelf, #chopin, #linux, #lisp, and #reading.

The previous pod I was on had closed down many months ago (pod.thomasdalichow.de) and I'm only now getting set up again on Diaspora. I really missed the sense of community. These days I'm pretty busy during the day but when I have downtime in the evenings I like to play #tropico Right now I'm still on Tropico 5 (yes I realize that 6 has been out for awhile now!)
 

'Quick! Chase that Double Gloucester!' England's strangest hobbies – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

From second world war re-enactment to cheese rolling, Orlando Gili set out to capture bizarre English pastimes – many put on hold this year due to coronavirus
#photography #books

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/jul/01/quick-chase-that-double-gloucester-englands-strangest-hobbies-in-pictures#img-14

 

The soul of Tokyo: unseen shots from a Japanese master – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

Issei Suda is regarded as one of the most important names in Japanese photography. The striking world he captured is on display in these previously unpublished photos
#photography #books #Japan

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/jun/25/soul-of-tokyo-japanese-master-issei-suda-in-pictures

 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #books, #cycling, #italy, and #travel..
I’m so excited to get off FB and happy that I have found a way to still connect with friends.
 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #books, #cycling, #italy, and #travel..
I’m so excited to get off FB and happy that I have found a way to still connect with friends.
 
Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend. All animals are equal.

#AnimalFarm #antiauthorianism #JusticeForSnowball #Antifa #Equality #Orwell #Books #Literature
 

Housing estates and horses' backsides: a German view of 90s Britain – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

In the early 1990s, German photographer Peter Bialobrzeski travelled to the UK to explore the recession-hit nation in all its guises, from huntsmen lording it over servants to small children playing on a run-down street
Give My Regards To Elizabeth by photographer Peter Bialobrzeski is published by Dewi Lewis
#photography #books

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2020/may/26/housing-estates-and-horses-backsides-a-german-view-of-90s-britain

 
Image/Photo
#photography #books #miller
May 19, 2020
The Surrealist Eye of Lee Miller

The New York Review of Books

Photograph: Nude bent forward (thought to be Noma Rathner), Paris, 1930

Photographer: Lee Miller.
American Model, Photographer and Photojournalist WW11
https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/08/05/the-surrealist-eye-of-lee-miller/
 
Image/Photo
#photography #books #miller
May 19, 2020
The Surrealist Eye of Lee Miller

The New York Review of Books

Photograph: Nude bent forward (thought to be Noma Rathner), Paris, 1930

Photographer: Lee Miller.
American Model, Photographer and Photojournalist WW11
https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/08/05/the-surrealist-eye-of-lee-miller/
 

Amazon to cut price of its ebooks to reflect removal of VAT | Books | The Guardian

Amazon has confirmed it will cut the price of its Kindle ebooks from Friday, after the government announced it would bring forward plans to stop charging VAT on online publications because of the pandemic.
#books #reading #ebooks #Amazon #Kindle #UK
 
Image/Photo
Image/Photo
Image/Photo
Image/Photo

Some old Sci fi covers


I love these old science fiction covers from the seventies. These books I bought at a holidat in Devon, partly to read them, but also because I liked the scruffy, used, little books. I like books.

#art #book #books #covers #coverart #Scifi #sciencefiction #seventies
 
Quote of note:

"From AD166 to around AD180, repeated outbreaks occurred throughout the known world. Roman historians describe the legions being devastated, and entire towns and villages being depopulated and going to ruin. Rome itself was particularly badly affected, carts leaving the city each day piled high with dead bodies."

"In the middle of this plague, Marcus wrote a book, known as The Meditations, which records the moral and psychological advice he gave himself at this time. He frequently applies Stoic philosophy to the challenges of coping with pain, illness, anxiety and loss. It’s no stretch of the imagination to view The Meditations as a manual for developing precisely the mental resilience skills required to cope with a pandemic."

"First of all, because Stoics believe that our true good resides in our own character and actions, they would frequently remind themselves to distinguish between what’s “up to us” and what isn’t. Modern Stoics tend to call this 'the dichotomy of control' and many people find this distinction alone helpful in alleviating stress. What happens to me is never directly under my control, never completely up to me, but my own thoughts and actions are – at least the voluntary ones. The pandemic isn’t really under my control but the way I behave in response to it is."

Via Stoicism in a time of pandemic: how Marcus Aurelius can help




#philosophy #stoicism #history #MarcusAurelius #COVID19 #coronavirus #pandemic #books
 
Almost brings a tear to my eye... Some truly great First Ladies, doing great public service things like this. Michelle Obama is serving children and families still. {Miss her yet? Anyone seen any sign of a public-serving first lady since, say, 2016?)

Sigh...
Remember celebrations of family, love, unity, and progress in our country? Coming from the WhiteHouse, as opposed to hate & lies?
Remember 'Public Sevice'? Values? Michelle Obama Reads to Children for Month of Mondays

#children #michelleobama #books #publicservice #firstlady #FLOTUS #coping #staysafe #STFH #MakeAmericaSaneAgain

Twitter: Michelle Obama on Twitter (Michelle Obama)

 

Game Design Books: an observation


Last night I was leafing through my collection of game design books. I
got addicted to game design books in the hopes that one or more of these
would give me some insight into the process of game design. These books
are like flypaper for novice game designers like myself: they seem
attractive on the surface, but you can get stuck if you adhere to them
too closely (double meaning slightly intended). Many of them have
similar advice, starting with trying to define a game before jumping
into a broad survey of the different types of games that are out there.
Then they give some prescriptions of their own design process, and then
tell you how to land that job at that company you've dreamed of working
at (or worse, how to make money selling games by reading the gaming
market from the period before the book was published).

I've read more of these than I'd like to admit, and I've seen a lot of
different patterns in these books. Most are geared toward landing a job
in the video game industry. Many of them are tangentially related to
game design itself, spouting truisms like "optimize for fun" or "make
emergent play" (note: paraphrased). Some of them actually guide through
the process of designing a game and what to notice, but a good number of
them cut the conversation short so they can focus on the next topic.

Last night I got frustrated at one book because it referenced "The
Hero's Journey" by Joseph Campbell and the abridged version for writers
"The Writer's Journey" by Christopher Vogler. (If you've ever wondered
why your reluctant hero has to have a call to action to fight the big
baddie at the end now you know what advice the designer took to heart.)
I started looking through other books in my collection to see what other
designers prescribed this advice. If there's one thing I would love to
recommend to designers is to read the myths themselves without the lens
of Joseph Campbell. I promise they're much more interesting than his
ridiculously oversimplified and wrong formula.

I then leafed through some mechanics books. That got me looking at some
wargame design books. Maybe I was tired, but the book I picked up felt
like someone rambling to me about wargames more than instructing me how
to design war games. True, it was starting with the rules for a
particular war game (and I'm not naming the book in particular in part
because I'm thinking the fault is with my patience rather than the
material) but it got me thinking about war games, and then I wanted to
look at one war game in particular: Eastern
Front
, by Chris
Crawford
.

Eastern Front was a pivotal game for the Atari computers. It was a
graphical masterpiece and did what few games of the era could do: create
a tactical war game that could be played against the computer with
credible opposition. It was also written in 16K and published by Atari's
"Atari Program
Exchange
" (a
user-submitted, curated label for Atari Software). It was written using
Atari's Assembler Editor cartridge over the span of about a year (around
900 hours of development).

What made Eastern Front so special was Chris also released the source
code via APX. Rather than just a dump of the source code it also
includes a section explaining the code and the decisions behind it. In
those 60+ pages of text and notes Chris gives a masterclass of game
design and his approach to design. He talks about his design process,
decisions he made for code, and the playtest feedback he received. He
talks about his frustrations, his triumphs, and (of course) the cycle
count on the Atari and the efficiency of the routines.

The manual has been scanned and is available on the Internet Archive
(Eastern Front Source
Code
.

At the time the source code for Eastern Front was \$150 in 1980s
dollars. Had I known what I know now I think this would have been a wise
investment for my game design interests. It sure would have saved me
from purchasing all of the other books that didn't give me nearly as
much information.

You can find the source code for Eastern Front and other games that
Chris Crawford has written on in his source code
library
.

(I may write up a second post of books that I recommend for game
designers that touch more on the process of game design rather than
paint it with broad strokes, but for now the one that I'm finding most
helpful is Think Like a Game
Designer

by Justin Gary.)

Image/Photo

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/CraigMaloney/~3/k5WU-SDvfGI/
#Adayinthelife #GameDesign #Books
 
Image/Photo
I’m off to another world today.

#books #reading
 

Apple Books: Free novels and audiobooks to get you through self-isolation | Cult of Mac

Apple is offering users in the U.S. (and hopefully elsewhere soon) a selection of free books and audiobooks to help while away the hours while in self-isolation.
Not available in the UK yet.

#books #Apple #SocialIsolation
Apple Books offering free novels and audiobooks to get you through self-isolation
 

RSF opens “The Uncensored Library” – The digital home of Press Freedom within a global computer game | RSF

Press freedom NGO, Reporters Without Borders (RSF), creates a loophole to overcome censorship by building a safe haven for press freedom. Where? Within one of the world’s most successful video games, Minecraft.
#technology #tech #books #censorship #freedom
 

Millions of Books Are Secretly in the Public Domain. You Can Download Them Free | Motherboard

A quirk of copyright law means that millions of books are now free for anyone to read, thanks to some work from the New York Public Library.
People have been resharing this, so I thought it's time I posted it again.

#copyright #PublicDomain #books #library
 
#Rush #books
The Best Books for Rush Fans
 

From Permanent Record by Edward Snowden pgs. 191-193


"Our mission was pretty much appliance-based on this one afternoon I'm recalling - we were in Best Buy. Having settled on a new microwave, we were checking out, on Lindsay'a healthful insistence, a display of blenders. She had her phone out and was in the midst of researching which of the ten or so devices had the best reviews, when I found myself wandering over to the computer department at the far end of the store.

But along the way I stopped. There, at the edge of the kitchenware section, ensconced atop a brightly decorated and lit elevated platform, was a shiny new refrigerator. Rather, it was a 'Smart-fridge' which was being advertised as 'Internet-equipped.'

This, plain and simple, blew my mind.

A salesperson approached, interpreting my stupefaction as interest - "It's amazing, isn't it?" - and proceeded to demonstrate a few of the features. A screen was embedded in the door of the fridge, and next to the door was a tiny stylus, which allowed you to scribble messages. If you didn't want to scribble, you could record audio and video memos. You could also use the screen as your regular computer, because the refrigerator had Wi-Fi. You could check your email, or check your calendar. You could watch YouTube clips, or listen to MP3s. You could even make phone calls. I had to restrain myself from keying in Lindsay's number and saying from across the floor, "I'm calling you from a fridge."

Beyond that, the salesperson continued, the fridge's computer kept track of internal temperature, and, through scanning barcodes, the freshness of your food. It provided nutritional information and suggested recipes. I think the price was over $9,ooo. "Delivery included," the salesperson said.

I remember driving home in a confused silence. This wasn't quite the stunning moonshot tech-future we'd been promised. I was convinced the only reason the thing was Internet- equipped was so that it could report back to its manufacturer about its owner's usage and about any other household data that was obtainable. The manufacturer, in turn, would monetize that data by selling it. And we were supposed to pay for the privilege.

I wondered what the point was of my getting so worked up over government surveillance if my friends, neighbours, and fellow citizens were more than happy to invite corporate surveillance into their homes, allowing themselves to be tracked while browsing in their pantries as efficiently as if they were browsing the Web. It would be another half decade before the domotics revolution, before 'virtual assistants' like Amazon Echo and Google Home were welcomed into bedroom and placed proudly on nightstands to record and transmit all activity within range, to log all habits and preferences (not to mention fetishes and kinks), which would then be developed into advertising algorithms and converted into cash. The data we generate just by living - or just by letting ourselves be surveilled while living - would enrich private enterprise and impoverish our private existence in equal measure. If government surveillance was having the effect of turning the citizen into a subject, at the mercy of state power, then corporate surveillance was turning the consumer into a product, which corporations sold to other corporations, data brokers and advertisers.

Meanwhile, it felt as if every major tech company, including Dell, was rolling out new civilian versions of what I was working on for the CIA: a cloud. (In fact, Dell had even tried four years previously to trademark the term 'cloud-computing' but was denied). I was amazed at how willingly people were signing up, so excited at the prospect of their photos and videos and music and e-books being universally backed up and available that they never gave much thought as to why such uber-sophisticated and convenient storage solution was being offered to them for 'free' or for 'cheap' in the first place.

I don't think I'd ever seen such a concept be so uniformly bought into on every side. 'The cloud' was as effective a sales term for Dell to sell to the CIA as it was for Amazon and Apple and Google to sell to their users. I can still close my eyes and hear Cliff some CIA suit about how "with the cloud, you'll be able to push security updates across agency computers world-wide," or "when the cloud's up and running, the agency will be able to track who has read what file world-wide." The cloud was white and fluffy and peaceful, floating high above the fray. Though many clouds make a stormy sky, a single cloud provided a benevolent bit of shade. It was protective. I think it made everyone think of heaven. "
dl #EdwardSnowden #CIA #cloud #comuting #surveillance #books at
 

From Permanent Record by Edward Snowden pgs. 191-193


"Our mission was pretty much appliance-based on this one afternoon I'm recalling - we were in Best Buy. Having settled on a new microwave, we were checking out, on Lindsay'a healthful insistence, a display of blenders. She had her phone out and was in the midst of researching which of the ten or so devices had the best reviews, when I found myself wandering over to the computer department at the far end of the store.

But along the way I stopped. There, at the edge of the kitchenware section, ensconced atop a brightly decorated and lit elevated platform, was a shiny new refrigerator. Rather, it was a 'Smart-fridge' which was being advertised as 'Internet-equipped.'

This, plain and simple, blew my mind.

A salesperson approached, interpreting my stupefaction as interest - "It's amazing, isn't it?" - and proceeded to demonstrate a few of the features. A screen was embedded in the door of the fridge, and next to the door was a tiny stylus, which allowed you to scribble messages. If you didn't want to scribble, you could record audio and video memos. You could also use the screen as your regular computer, because the refrigerator had Wi-Fi. You could check your email, or check your calendar. You could watch YouTube clips, or listen to MP3s. You could even make phone calls. I had to restrain myself from keying in Lindsay's number and saying from across the floor, "I'm calling you from a fridge."

Beyond that, the salesperson continued, the fridge's computer kept track of internal temperature, and, through scanning barcodes, the freshness of your food. It provided nutritional information and suggested recipes. I think the price was over $9,ooo. "Delivery included," the salesperson said.

I remember driving home in a confused silence. This wasn't quite the stunning moonshot tech-future we'd been promised. I was convinced the only reason the thing was Internet- equipped was so that it could report back to its manufacturer about its owner's usage and about any other household data that was obtainable. The manufacturer, in turn, would monetize that data by selling it. And we were supposed to pay for the privilege.

I wondered what the point was of my getting so worked up over government surveillance if my friends, neighbours, and fellow citizens were more than happy to invite corporate surveillance into their homes, allowing themselves to be tracked while browsing in their pantries as efficiently as if they were browsing the Web. It would be another half decade before the domotics revolution, before 'virtual assistants' like Amazon Echo and Google Home were welcomed into bedroom and placed proudly on nightstands to record and transmit all activity within range, to log all habits and preferences (not to mention fetishes and kinks), which would then be developed into advertising algorithms and converted into cash. The data we generate just by living - or just by letting ourselves be surveilled while living - would enrich private enterprise and impoverish our private existence in equal measure. If government surveillance was having the effect of turning the citizen into a subject, at the mercy of state power, then corporate surveillance was turning the consumer into a product, which corporations sold to other corporations, data brokers and advertisers.

Meanwhile, it felt as if every major tech company, including Dell, was rolling out new civilian versions of what I was working on for the CIA: a cloud. (In fact, Dell had even tried four years previously to trademark the term 'cloud-computing' but was denied). I was amazed at how willingly people were signing up, so excited at the prospect of their photos and videos and music and e-books being universally backed up and available that they never gave much thought as to why such uber-sophisticated and convenient storage solution was being offered to them for 'free' or for 'cheap' in the first place.

I don't think I'd ever seen such a concept be so uniformly bought into on every side. 'The cloud' was as effective a sales term for Dell to sell to the CIA as it was for Amazon and Apple and Google to sell to their users. I can still close my eyes and hear Cliff some CIA suit about how "with the cloud, you'll be able to push security updates across agency computers world-wide," or "when the cloud's up and running, the agency will be able to track who has read what file world-wide." The cloud was white and fluffy and peaceful, floating high above the fray. Though many clouds make a stormy sky, a single cloud provided a benevolent bit of shade. It was protective. I think it made everyone think of heaven. "
dl #EdwardSnowden #CIA #cloud #comuting #surveillance #books at
 
Elsewhere, Ken Liu, multitalented writer, lawyer, and translator has project management lessons for you:

P: Mar.. er... Sire, it's simply not possible to produce statues worthy of such an august purpose in so little time. The statue of Lord Fithowéo in my temple took ten craftsmen a full year's worth of work. It takes time to source the right materials; time to sketch a suitable likeness; time to rough cut, to carve, to smooth, to lay down gold foil, to paint; time to consecrate an auspicious day for the painting of the eyes and opening of the mouth. What you ask for is simply not possible.
K: You say that ten men took a year to carve one statue. But I have given you more than one thousand men. Surely they can do in three days the same amount of work.
P: By that logic, if you have ten women, they will surely be able to produce a child for you in one month.
K: has P. killed publicly 'by having his belly sliced open in front of the temple of Fithowéo so that all could see how tangled his entrails had become due to his obstinacy and internal blindness'.

cf. Wall of Storms, 2nd part of the Dandelion Dynasty series. Here's an interview podcast with the author. I don't usually read fantasy much at all, but hell yeah do I recommend to read this series. #projectmanagement #kenliu #fantasy #novel #books
 
That's a pretty good Lulu coupon.
---
RT @[email protected]
🎲LULU WITH 15% OFF AND FREE SHIPPING! Good until November 14th!🎲

Use the coupons ONESHIP and LKAB317CD in this sequence!

Looking for suggestions? http://bit.ly/2XKTVtW

#TTRPG #DnD #OSR #Books #Sale
https://twitter.com/diogo_oldskull/status/1192982860929609728
Image/Photo
Italy 
That's a pretty good Lulu coupon.
 
7/7



7 Day Book Challenge: to post the covers of seven books you love (1 book per day for 7 days) - no explanations, no reviews, just the covers.

Also, ask a friend each day to take up the challenge. There’s no obligation to accept the challenge. Are you in?

Open invitation: if you’re reading this and like the idea of seeing many covers around to explore, don’t wait to be invited. Please jump in to start sharing 7 covers over 7 days, tagging others and use the hashtag #7DayBookCoverChallenge to see what others have posted (and for others can see what you post.)

#7DayBookCoverChallenge #books
 
Later posts Earlier posts