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Tabletop QOTD 2020-06-23


Borrowing from the idea of the Pluspora Check-in get some tabletop conversation going. If you have any questions that you want to get on the list to be asked, let me know. Also, if you'd like to be added or taken off the list of participants, let me know.

Do you have different rules for people new to the game?

It can be hard to get people interested in the hobby- I try to make my games friendly for newbies.

#BoardGames

In the first few games, I try to give suggestions to the other players, and allow them to take back moves that I know are bad- letting them know why its bad. I try not to take it to the level of playing the game for the person, but I try to make it at least competitive.

#RPGs

I aid in building characters, and allow a few games until the character is solidified. When actually playing, I tend not to hold hands as much during the role-playing part, but in the combat part, it's pretty similar to board games.

#Tabletop #QOTD

@Eric Franklin
@frasersimons
@Board Games Forum
@Curt Thompson
@Douglas Bailey
@Jesse Butler
@Keith Davies
@Martin Ralya
@Martijn Vos
@Nathan V
@Marsha B
@Stuntman
@Moe Tousignant
@PresGas (OSR) Aspect
@Craig Maloney
@Patrick Marchiodi
@Nathan Norway
@silverwizard
@Stephen Gunnell
@Joseph Teller
@Charles M
@UnclePirate (Stan McCann)

For board games, new players should get re-dos and advice along the way even though it makes her kick your butts. Memories of bringing in a player to Munchkins.

As for role playing, I can't remember a new player in an existing campaign so having different level players wasn't a problem. Differing experience was always handled efficiently by the GMs I've played with. I have run a few campaigns, but always with experienced players.

With board games, often when we have a new player we'll play at least a little while 'open hand', with each person describing what they're doing and why. We might play the entire game that way, or just a round or two and then restart... it depends.

When teaching a new game, it's really not about winning or losing for anyone. I've found most people reasonably expect to lose the first few times they play a game, but they get really frustrated when they can't understand what's going on.

For instance, when teaching my wife how to play Call to Adventure this evening, we each showed the cards we were choosing from, I explained why I chose the (origin, motivation, destiny) I did and what strategies I'd be following because of it.



 

How can you get a fair shake when the Cop Gang has all the authority?


Andres ran down the driveway, got on his knees and put his hands behind his head. Then 1 Cop shot him in the back 7 times. They broke all the cameras and took the DVR, which they pulled a warrant for after the fact.
#Current Events #BlackLivesMatter
#Current #BlackLivesMatter BlackLivesMatter CurrentEvents
Yeah, here in the Southwest, BLM could stand for Brown Lives Matter. One question asked was "Where is Raza?" I'd like to see the Hispanic population stand too. I think they are, just not as loudly. They may not want to steal the spotlight on BLM.

Hey @Chuck Dee, I watched "True Justice" on HBO last night. Very much on point for our discussion the other day. But so sad. The man (I can't remember his name) is still fighting for justice. Excellent movie if you get the chance.

I wish that we could abandon racism at all so that this would apply to everyone, and we could appreciate color without the baggage.

Exactly @Chuck Dee. Me too. I would also like to rid myself of some of my identified "white allergies." Although I have learned how not to say it, sometimes the N word comes to mind or the insult "for a Black." It is from many years of thinking that way and meaning it. I was never an overt racist, but I did have the tendency. The thought still comes but I don't mean it anymore. I have learned to love and respect all humans.

And I think that though it is true that people that are hurt tend not to react at their best, from the other side people can be more understanding of the process. Admitting who you were and having the desire to change should never be discouraged. I remember Liam Neeson's confession and his shame at the man that he used to be, and how he was dragged for admitting how he used to be. That's a part of the process, and needs to be recognized as such, and people shouldn't be degraded for that.



 

Tabletop QOTD 2020-06-17


Borrowing from the idea of the Pluspora Check-in get some tabletop conversation going. If you have any questions that you want to get on the list to be asked, let me know. Also, if you'd like to be added or taken off the list of participants, let me know.

Last time, we asked "In your opinion, what sets the truly great games apart from all the rest?"

In contrast to this, "What sets the truly memorable sessions apart from the rest? Do you have any examples of a session that sticks out in your mind?"


Memorable sessions usually consist of unplanned moments when something truly extraordinary happens.

#BoardGames

I have a few, but my most memorable one was in Shogun (Samurai Swords), where one player was decimated in the beginning, having only one army left, though it had a good composition. Normally, that wouldn't matter, as attrition hurts any army that cannot be replenished. But everyone else was rolling terribly that night, and he ended up somehow almost winning.

#RPGs

In one Rolemaster campaign based in Middle Earth, we had a series of bad choices that kept making the situation worse and worse.

It started with a 66 crit on our paladin that destroyed his helm, but did no other damage. Right after that, we found some loot- and in there was a helm. It turned out that it was a helm of opposite alignment.

The paladin's opposing deity which he now worshipped counseled him that a turning pont was coming and that he should hide his changes. I'll have to give it to the player- he played it well, and in retrospect, he threw out a lot of signs that he was no longer LG, but LE. But we ignored them.

The fellowship was ambushed because of information that he gave, and the split that happened because of Boromir happened because of this betrayal instead. We were tasked with taking up for the original fellowship and finding and shepherding Frodo and the hobbits. One of the nazgul attacked the party, and that's when the Paladin revealed himself, killing the hobbits, and throwing Frodo to the Nazgul, who took off with him.

The rest of us tried to recover from that, and get to Sauron before the ring did. We thought that we were fast enough, but we weren't, and ended up fighting Sauron at the height of his power. As we teleported in, he met us immediately with an amped up shock bolt of all things that incinerated one PC. Another attacked, and actually did damage- he cast 'Be Not' on that PC. The rest of us fled.

The only thing good about that encounter was that the PC that had 'Be Not' was one of those players that talks endlessly about his character's exploits. Whenever he started with "I remember when Renegade..." we'd interrupt him with "Who?"

#Tabletop #QOTD

@Eric Franklin
@frasersimons
@Board Games Forum
@Curt Thompson
@Douglas Bailey
@Jesse Butler
@Keith Davies
@Martin Ralya
@Martijn Vos
@Nathan V
@Marsha B
@Stuntman
@Moe Tousignant
@PresGas (OSR) Aspect
@Craig Maloney
@Patrick Marchiodi
@Nathan Norway
@silverwizard
@Stephen Gunnell
@Joseph Teller
@Charles M

:D
A GM didn't think it through when he told a group of us to design one item that we want. Instant tower, fully furnished and equipped. It got used as a HUGE bag of holding.

At the Windsor Gaming Society which was being overrun by collectible card game players. The only game I brought was Vampire the Masquerade but that session got cancelled due to the crew coming in from Essex having car problems.

We weren't interested in playing cards so I made up an RPG on the spot.

It was called Pirates of THE Spanish Highlands and was one of the most ridiculous and over the top games I had ever run. It was 100% improvised.

For some reason, Barnacles were the currency in the game, and when you got XP a Sea Captain with 2 peg legs and 2 peg arms would roll into the scene cartwhealing on all his peg appendages and his head. Tink, tink, tink, ouch!, tink, tink, tink, tink, ouch, tink, ARR Ye get 10 XP, tink, tink, tink ouch, tink, tink, tink....

That was one of the most fun RPG sessions I've ever had in my life and the players all agreed. From that point onward I improvised a lot more in all of my games and went from spending like 20 hours a week prepping to maybe 2 hours.



 

More Anansi


#AmericanGods #Anansi #TV

YouTube: Mr Nansi's talk with other Gods. (Adrian Nelson)

My worshippers know... Freedom ain't Free.
#AmericanGods #Anansi #TV AmericanGods Anansi TV


 

American Gods' Showrunner thought we didn't need to hear this?


#AmericanGods #Anansi #TV You think you just people. Let me be the first to tell you that you are all Black. The moment these Dutch motherfuckers set foot here and decided they White- then you get to be Black and that's the nice name they call you...

That shit is powerful and relevant. Motherfucker that denied us seeing Orlando Jones channel Anansi because "We don't need to hear it" needs to be fucking shot.
#AmericanGods #Anansi #TV AmericanGods Anansi TV


 

Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man


So good. I knew that Matthew McConaughey was a great guy before this, but the questions that he asked. And that simple statement. "Heard."

You could see him learning just in that segment.

This is what it takes.

And back to that Langston Hughes poem, "Let America Be America Again," the implication that was brought up about one simple line: "... the land that has never been yet..."

America touts itself as many things. Egalitarian. Democratic. The Land of the Free. The Home of the Brave.

America has never been what it has aspired to be. But it can. The framework is there for it to be that. And that's where I place my hope.
Good one. I'd seen a different interview. I like that too. Heard.





 

Tabletop QOTD 2020-06-09


Borrowing from the idea of the Pluspora Check-in get some tabletop conversation going. If you have any questions that you want to get on the list to be asked, let me know. Also, if you'd like to be added or taken off the list of participants, let me know.

In your opinion, what sets the truly great games apart from all the rest?

The best games to me are the ones that I can play and get people to play. If I can't get it to the table, it never really becomes a game. In those, there are different criteria for board games vs RPGs.

#BoardGames

Ones that make you interact with the other players in interesting ways, postiively or negatively. Games where you don't have any interaction with others might as well be solo, in my opinion. And when those interactions become interesting, you get some truly extraordinary experiences.

#RPGs

Those games that are able to stoke my imagination, and have everything pushing you towards buy in and losing yourself in the game world in a perfect combination of rules and campaign lore. Sometimes, the latter can be provided by the GM, elevating a so-so game into something great.

#Tabletop #QOTD

@Eric Franklin
@frasersimons
@Board Games Forum
@Curt Thompson
@Douglas Bailey
@Jesse Butler
@Keith Davies
@Martin Ralya
@Martijn Vos
@Nathan V
@Marsha B
@Stuntman
@Moe Tousignant
@PresGas (OSR) Aspect
@Craig Maloney
@Patrick Marchiodi
@Nathan Norway
@silverwizard
@Stephen Gunnell
@Joseph Teller
@Charles M

A good GM can make a badly written RPG (engine or adventure) fun. A bad GM can make a great RPG not-fun.

I've never played a pre-printed module/adventure that really worked for me as a player / the group I was in. I've only GMed maybe once or twice with pre-printed stuff that didn't fall flat (not horrible games, but not what the group really wanted/enjoyed). Some of that is because the majority of my use of pre-printed stuff happened in high school, when my gaming group lacked the maturity to care. So I'm always reluctant to try published adventures now, even if they might be great.

Combat can be fun, but it almost never rises to the level of truly great gaming -- combat tends to devolve to a process of round-by-round selecting the "optimal" attack and rolling through the mechanics. I enjoy it, but it is really hard for a fight to rise to truly great in my mind.

For me, a truly great game makes me imagination come alive. It isn't just me scrambling to find that one thing on my character sheet for this round of fighting, but seeing the world come alive from my PC's perspective. Situations that require creative thinking and teamwork -- but not cryptic puzzles that are hard for the sake of being hard. Interactions with NPCs that impact more than just the short-term space during which the conversation happens, things that make a game more than just my character surviving.

I think there are multiple ways for a wold to come alive. There's LoTR vs Thieves Guild feel, or Part 3 vs Part 4 JoJo. Or STTNG vs DS9.

With an epic journey, the feeling of an expansive world comes from brief fleeting encounters - the meeting and seeing of things which come and go for once in a lifetime. Interactions with most NPCs will not have a long term impact, but the characters know how fleeting this meeting will be so they make the most of their limited time together.

In contrast, a fixed city setting can build a feeling of an expansive world through depth and density. There's the feeling of a rich ocean of people, with relationships and cliques and organizations. Anything you do or experience could set off a cascade of consequences.

What's interesting to me is a third way, which goes in the opposite direction. The traditional roguelike is a dungeon crawl which is utterly devoid of role playing elements. It's like taking D&D rules and only seeing the formulas that can easily be plugged into a computer algorithm. And yet it can still instill a sense of wonder in the player, and inspire the player's imagination. How? By making the dungeon itself a sort of character. In games like Rogue or Temple of Apshai or Moria, the lack of role playing is because the dungeon is a monster infested ruin. You don't have NPCs to interact with because the people who dwelled there are long dead and gone. But you can still feel their spirit in the majesty of what they left behind. You can still feel a sense of what was lost.

This is a trick that works well with videogames, even when it's not explicitly invoked (for example, the original Legend of Zelda game). Simulating convincing interactions with the living is hard. A one-way relationship with the dead/past? That's more doable.




 

Bundle for Racial Justice and Equality


Buy the bundle, get good games, support the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and Community Bail Fund


#Tabletop #RPGs #ComputerGames
#Tabletop #RPGs #ComputerGames ComputerGames RPGs Tabletop



 
#music #hip-hop

YouTube: Police State (dead prez - Topic)

#music #hip-hop hip-hop music


 
My heroes didn’t tolerate Nazis. I don’t either.
Image/Photo
Image/Photo


 

Tabletop QOTD 2020-06-02


Borrowing from the idea of the Pluspora Check-in get some tabletop conversation going. If you have any questions that you want to get on the list to be asked, let me know. Also, if you'd like to be added or taken off the list of participants, let me know.

Do you have a set gaming schedule? Do you prefer scheduling time for games, or pick up games?

Pick up games rarely catch me in the right mood to play, which is the reason that I have so hard a time getting into our normal family gaming. We tried to have a 'game night' but something always came up- my family is way busier than I am.

I have a regular session now on roll20, and it's nice to be back in that groove. Before that, all I had was pbems/play by document, and those are pretty much pick up games, as they're asynchronous. But the difference between that and other types of pick up games is that I can take them as I get a chance, as long as I get my turns in by the scheduled time.

#Tabletop #QOTD

@Eric Franklin
@frasersimons
@Board Games Forum
@Curt Thompson
@Douglas Bailey
@Jesse Butler
@Keith Davies
@Martin Ralya
@Martijn Vos
@Nathan V
@Marsha B
@Stuntman
@Moe Tousignant
@PresGas (OSR) Aspect
@Craig Maloney
@Patrick Marchiodi
@Nathan Norway
@silverwizard
@Stephen Gunnell
@Joseph Teller
@Charles M

Board games were mostly scheduled, because they need physical presence (simulators really don't do it for us).

RPGs have mostly been scheduled so people can plan to be there or not. I've been in a few pick up games and would like to be in more... but I've been on an RPG hiatus because of COVID.

Not because of personal infection. I work in the social sector, and while I'm not front line (I work in a data warehouse, almost as far from that as you can get) I provide data to people trying to get a grasp on what's happening and provide financial assistance as best we can.. I don't have the energy to game right now.

Normally yes and no. Right now, heck no, I game when I can.

The 2nd, 3rd and 4th Saturday of every month I ran board game events at local venues. In addition, I had a home game night on Mondays where we were supposed to play RPGs but never got a full group so played board games. I also played and live-streamed Gloomhaven every Friday.

In addition to this would be random pick up games that would happen randomly throughout the week. Sometimes with my kids or the whole family or I would get together with other local games.

Now I play a lot of BGA throughout the day and once a month sit down with one of our Patreon patrons to pay a game online somehow, other than that my wife and I have been getting together about every other weekend to play two-player games and now and then I game with the kids but they are actually busier with school now than they were when in school.




 

Gary Clark, Jr on Howard Stern


Props to Howard Stern. This is the first time I've heard him perform him live where it wasn't censored. #music #GaryClarkJr #bluesrock
#music #GaryClarkJr #bluesrock bluesrock garyclarkjr music



 

Tabletop QOTD 2020-05-28


Borrowing from the idea of the Pluspora Check-in get some tabletop conversation going. If you have any questions that you want to get on the list to be asked, let me know. Also, if you'd like to be added or taken off the list of participants, let me know.

Which tabletop gaming item do you wish you had never given away?

I had to move in a short period of time, and had to leave behind close to a third of my collection. Most of those were Palladium books and esoteric GURPS books that I hadn't looked at in forever, but sometimes, I go to find a reference, and only then realize that it was in those stacks.

I also got rid of the SAGA system games (Dragonlance/Marvel Super Heroes). I had copies of the book for the Marvel system, but not the cards. Both of those have been hard to come by in good condition.

On the boardgame side, I've given away a lot of boardgames recently to my local library because of space concerns. But I haven't had anyone to play them with for a while- if I start to play again, I'm sure I'll miss something there, but I've been pretty methodical in the ones that I've given away, so I hope not.

#Tabletop #QOTD

@Eric Franklin
@frasersimons
@Board Games Forum
@Curt Thompson
@Douglas Bailey
@Jesse Butler
@Keith Davies
@Martin Ralya
@Martijn Vos
@Nathan V
@Marsha B
@Stuntman
@Moe Tousignant
@PresGas (OSR) Aspect
@Craig Maloney
@Patrick Marchiodi
@Nathan Norway
@silverwizard
@Stephen Gunnell
@Joseph Teller
@Charles M

I'm a hoarder. I don't give things away unless I'm really absolutely 100% sure I'm never even going to think about it.
I do occasionally loan something out, though. Like GURPS Russia, which I loaned to a friend, and I have no idea who it was, and nobody seems to have it. Or maybe my brother had it? I should ask him.

Nothing I can think of. I still have most of my gaming collection and what I gave away/sold/traded I really didn't need anymore.



 

Tabletop QOTD 2020-05-23


Borrowing from the idea of the Pluspora Check-in get some tabletop conversation going. If you have any questions that you want to get on the list to be asked, let me know. Also, if you'd like to be added or taken off the list of participants, let me know.

Which games that you liked when you were first exposed to them do you feel less enthused about now? Which games that you disliked when you were first exposed to them do you feel more enthusiastic about now? What changed your mind?

When I first played Cards against Humanity and others like it, I liked the social experience. But being the non-social person that I am, I like to interact with the rules more than just the social aspects, so I find that it now is more of a job to play than an enjoyable diversion.

I have fond memories of D&D, but left it behind a while ago. So when the idea of OSR games came about, I was less than enthusiastic about them. Kevin Crawford single-handedly changed my mind, and made me look at OSR as it is- bring older sensibilities in gaming back to the fore but with the benefit of newer design concepts.


#Tabletop #QOTD

@Eric Franklin
@frasersimons
@Board Games Forum
@Curt Thompson
@Douglas Bailey
@Jesse Butler
@Keith Davies
@Martin Ralya
@Martijn Vos
@Nathan V
@Marsha B
@Stuntman
@Moe Tousignant
@PresGas (OSR) Aspect
@Craig Maloney
@Patrick Marchiodi
@Nathan Norway
@silverwizard
@Stephen Gunnell
@Joseph Teller
@Charles M

Pathfinder. For a long time 3.x was my preferred D&D because it was easy to design for. Pathfinder came along and buffed it up (and I admit, I was somewhat cheesed with how WotC botched 4e -- 3e marketing was great, 4e marketing was underpants gnomes all the way down and they lost me).

Then it went to 11 and got crunchier and crunchier with more exceptions to remember. It became something I no longer wanted to play because of the expertise required. I went back to old school games.

That said, I do still mine Pathfinder for other game projects. Just because it's more fiddly than I want to play doesn't mean it's not a good place to get ideas for other systems.

GURPS. When they announced D&D 4 was coming down the pipeline, we jumped ship and bought into GURPS. But, because we didn't game very often, we never really figured out how to do GURPS the right way. This meant we spent WAY TOO MUCH TIME flailing around in the rules book vs. time playing fluidly. That's more on us than the rules, but there are LOTS of rules. We finally realized that if we stuck to the basic stuff, we didn't have nearly as many issues with it. But it took a while to figure that out. Plus, it just has a different feel than other engines we knew at the time.

I bought the core books for D&D 4 years later, but I have never played it. My read of the rules made it seem like they drifted too far into video game territory. D&D 5 seems to have corrected most of what I disliked there, but not 100% (mostly around things that reset immediately at the end of a combat sequence).

D&D 3.x had too much reliance on miniatures. I enjoy miniatures -- to a point. But you basically couldn't do combat in D&D 3x without them, due to how many things relied on knowing exactly where things were. Feats, primarily. Oh and gods there were too many feats and prestige classes!