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Wildfires are erasing Western forests. #Climate #change is making it permanent.


source: https://grist.org/climate/climate-change-forest-loss/
The driving force here is that the rising global temperature is wiping out seedlings. In many spots around the U.S. West, summer temperatures are already high enough to cook young trees before they can develop thick protective bark. Others have become so dry that seedlings shrivel before their roots can grow deep enough to reach #groundwater. Both circumstances can thwart forest regeneration. Mature trees can survive in these areas long after they stop reproducing. But when fires wipe out these forests and seedings can’t get a foothold, they are replaced with grasses and dense #brush.
Image/Photo

#nature #crisis #warming #temprature #usa #fire #tree #forest #plants #future #news
 

Wildfires are erasing Western forests. #Climate #change is making it permanent.


source: https://grist.org/climate/climate-change-forest-loss/
The driving force here is that the rising global temperature is wiping out seedlings. In many spots around the U.S. West, summer temperatures are already high enough to cook young trees before they can develop thick protective bark. Others have become so dry that seedlings shrivel before their roots can grow deep enough to reach #groundwater. Both circumstances can thwart forest regeneration. Mature trees can survive in these areas long after they stop reproducing. But when fires wipe out these forests and seedings can’t get a foothold, they are replaced with grasses and dense #brush.
Image/Photo

#nature #crisis #warming #temprature #usa #fire #tree #forest #plants #future #news
 
● NEWS ● #TheHill #Environment ☞ #Climate tipping points: The Arctic is a bellwether for irreversible change
 
● NEWS ● #TheHill #Environment ☞ #Climate tipping points: The Arctic is a bellwether for irreversible change
 




Inhabitants

An Indigenous Perspective


Inhabitants: An Indigenous Perspective is a feature-length documentary that follows five North American tribes restoring their ancient relationships with the land while adapting to today’s climate crisis.

The film travels across diverse bioregions of North America, from deserts and coastlines, to forests, mountains, and prairies, highlighting the dramatic effects of climate change and stories of indigenous land stewardship practices, which continue to be resilient in the face of a changing climate. The film focuses on five stories: the return of prescribed fire practices by the Karuk Tribe in California; the restoration of buffalo on the Blackfeet reservation in Montana; sustained traditions of Hopi dryland farming in Arizona; sustainable forestry on the Menominee reservation in Wisconsin; and the revival of native Hawaiian food forests in Hawaii.

Although these stories are not connected geographically, and only represent a small portion of the many diverse indigenous communities leading efforts to maintain their cultural practices and identity, they all share the common dimensions of “traditional knowledges.” According to Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives,"[traditional knowledges] broadly refer to indigenous communities’ ways of knowing that both guide and result from their communities members’ close relationships with and responsibilities towards the landscapes, waterscapes, plants, and animals that are vital to the flourishing of indigenous cultures."

Climate change poses an immediate threat to Indigenous Peoples’ health, well-being and ways of life. Tribal nations are on the front lines of confronting climate change, including increased frequency and intensity of wildfires, higher temperatures, ecosystem changes, ocean acidification, forest loss, and habitat damage. Climate change also raises questions about what will become of spiritually and culturally significant ecosystem services that are essential to maintaining many tribes’ identities. Indigenous communities are disproportionately harmed by the changing climate as they depend more on natural resources than the US population as a whole. Negative impacts include threats to traditional foods such as fish and crops which have provided sustenance as well as cultural, economic, medicinal, and community health for countless generations.

Emerging threats have galvanized a concerted effort by several tribes to forge ahead with climate-change adaptation strategies. They are leading the way guided by indigenous traditions and are quickly adapting to and even directly counteracting the shifting climate. Examples like the Hopi dry land farming techniques show how to deal with extremely arid and hot weather; the raising of Native Bison on the prairie lands of the Midwest improves carbon sequestration while removing the need for feedstocks; and forest fire management that is being guided by native forestry practices are just a few of the stories that give insight into how much wisdom and importance the indigenous land use practices reflect; and how crucial it is that their story is heard. The indigenous land management practices in the forests, deserts, prairies and coastlines of North America have much to offer to the current conversation surrounding climate adaptation and mitigation.

The First Peoples are estimated to have lived in North America for 15,000 years. In a few short centuries Native Americans have had most of their population systematically erased, almost all their land taken, and also been forced to deal with the disastrous effects of industrialization on their remaining resources. Tribal communities have proven to be remarkably resilient, surviving in some of the most extreme environments and having endured very aggressive marginalization. We can now create a platform for helping these marginalized people share their wisdom about how to live in these lands and how their history and tradition can inform and guide us. This documentary is an effort to give Native Americans an opportunity to share their stories of resilience and wisdom in the face of extreme climatic stress. We as a society can listen and learn from these stories of time tested land use practices. Now is the moment to support Native peoples in becoming leading voices on how to design, create, imagine and live in a more sustainable and resilient world.
This past fall we had the honor of documenting the prescribed fire traditions of the Karuk Tribe in Northern California and the sustainable forestry operations of the Menominee Tribe in Wisconsin. These stories are being woven into a feature length documentary Inhabitants due out in 2020. Folks have been asking a lot about the Woodlanders series and although I took a break last summer to focus on this feature film we are ramping up for a new season of short films starting in the Pacific Northwest next month. Thanks for your patience and support. — Costa Boutsikaris (2019)

#Woodlanders is an online film series that seeks to document the work of people who care for and depend on forests for their livelihood and well-being throughout the world.

Even among today’s progressive movements of local economy and food systems, the vast global knowledge of forest livelihoods and economies are mostly undervalued and undocumented. From woodcraft and nut tree cultures of ancient Europe, to mushroom and forest medicines of Asia, there many fascinating ways of creating sustainable economies from the forests while maintaining their ecological health and complexity. While filming Inhabit - A Permaculture Perspective I fell in love with woodland cultures and felt called to research further. Over the past year I began to create an accessible archive of these stories and I hope to share this inspiring world with you. Sustainable relationships with forests regenerate and protect these wild places while also offering livelihoods to humans. Each episode will focus on a person or culture who has a sustainable relationship and/or livelihood with a forest. Join me on the journey and learn how much forests can offer. — Costa Boutsikaris

#Inhabitants #documentary #film #nature #environment #climate #FirstPeoples #IndigenousPeoples #tribal #lands #community #people #climate-change #land #reservations #land-use #aboriginal #management #fires #bushfires #wildfires #forestry #dryland #farming #food #food-growing #well-being #wisdom #way-of-life #culture #tradition #food #food-growing #practices #natural #resources #ecology #stewardship #knowledge #education #adaptation #Karuk #Blackfeet #Hopi #Menominee #Hawaii #TraditionalEcologicalKnowledge #conservation #protection #preservation #sustainability #resilience #CostaBoutsikaris #InhabitFilms #docu-films
 




Inhabitants

An Indigenous Perspective


Inhabitants: An Indigenous Perspective is a feature-length documentary that follows five North American tribes restoring their ancient relationships with the land while adapting to today’s climate crisis.

The film travels across diverse bioregions of North America, from deserts and coastlines, to forests, mountains, and prairies, highlighting the dramatic effects of climate change and stories of indigenous land stewardship practices, which continue to be resilient in the face of a changing climate. The film focuses on five stories: the return of prescribed fire practices by the Karuk Tribe in California; the restoration of buffalo on the Blackfeet reservation in Montana; sustained traditions of Hopi dryland farming in Arizona; sustainable forestry on the Menominee reservation in Wisconsin; and the revival of native Hawaiian food forests in Hawaii.

Although these stories are not connected geographically, and only represent a small portion of the many diverse indigenous communities leading efforts to maintain their cultural practices and identity, they all share the common dimensions of “traditional knowledges.” According to Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives,"[traditional knowledges] broadly refer to indigenous communities’ ways of knowing that both guide and result from their communities members’ close relationships with and responsibilities towards the landscapes, waterscapes, plants, and animals that are vital to the flourishing of indigenous cultures."

Climate change poses an immediate threat to Indigenous Peoples’ health, well-being and ways of life. Tribal nations are on the front lines of confronting climate change, including increased frequency and intensity of wildfires, higher temperatures, ecosystem changes, ocean acidification, forest loss, and habitat damage. Climate change also raises questions about what will become of spiritually and culturally significant ecosystem services that are essential to maintaining many tribes’ identities. Indigenous communities are disproportionately harmed by the changing climate as they depend more on natural resources than the US population as a whole. Negative impacts include threats to traditional foods such as fish and crops which have provided sustenance as well as cultural, economic, medicinal, and community health for countless generations.

Emerging threats have galvanized a concerted effort by several tribes to forge ahead with climate-change adaptation strategies. They are leading the way guided by indigenous traditions and are quickly adapting to and even directly counteracting the shifting climate. Examples like the Hopi dry land farming techniques show how to deal with extremely arid and hot weather; the raising of Native Bison on the prairie lands of the Midwest improves carbon sequestration while removing the need for feedstocks; and forest fire management that is being guided by native forestry practices are just a few of the stories that give insight into how much wisdom and importance the indigenous land use practices reflect; and how crucial it is that their story is heard. The indigenous land management practices in the forests, deserts, prairies and coastlines of North America have much to offer to the current conversation surrounding climate adaptation and mitigation.

The First Peoples are estimated to have lived in North America for 15,000 years. In a few short centuries Native Americans have had most of their population systematically erased, almost all their land taken, and also been forced to deal with the disastrous effects of industrialization on their remaining resources. Tribal communities have proven to be remarkably resilient, surviving in some of the most extreme environments and having endured very aggressive marginalization. We can now create a platform for helping these marginalized people share their wisdom about how to live in these lands and how their history and tradition can inform and guide us. This documentary is an effort to give Native Americans an opportunity to share their stories of resilience and wisdom in the face of extreme climatic stress. We as a society can listen and learn from these stories of time tested land use practices. Now is the moment to support Native peoples in becoming leading voices on how to design, create, imagine and live in a more sustainable and resilient world.
This past fall we had the honor of documenting the prescribed fire traditions of the Karuk Tribe in Northern California and the sustainable forestry operations of the Menominee Tribe in Wisconsin. These stories are being woven into a feature length documentary Inhabitants due out in 2020. Folks have been asking a lot about the Woodlanders series and although I took a break last summer to focus on this feature film we are ramping up for a new season of short films starting in the Pacific Northwest next month. Thanks for your patience and support. — Costa Boutsikaris (2019)

#Woodlanders is an online film series that seeks to document the work of people who care for and depend on forests for their livelihood and well-being throughout the world.

Even among today’s progressive movements of local economy and food systems, the vast global knowledge of forest livelihoods and economies are mostly undervalued and undocumented. From woodcraft and nut tree cultures of ancient Europe, to mushroom and forest medicines of Asia, there many fascinating ways of creating sustainable economies from the forests while maintaining their ecological health and complexity. While filming Inhabit - A Permaculture Perspective I fell in love with woodland cultures and felt called to research further. Over the past year I began to create an accessible archive of these stories and I hope to share this inspiring world with you. Sustainable relationships with forests regenerate and protect these wild places while also offering livelihoods to humans. Each episode will focus on a person or culture who has a sustainable relationship and/or livelihood with a forest. Join me on the journey and learn how much forests can offer. — Costa Boutsikaris

#Inhabitants #documentary #film #nature #environment #climate #FirstPeoples #IndigenousPeoples #tribal #lands #community #people #climate-change #land #reservations #land-use #aboriginal #management #fires #bushfires #wildfires #forestry #dryland #farming #food #food-growing #well-being #wisdom #way-of-life #culture #tradition #food #food-growing #practices #natural #resources #ecology #stewardship #knowledge #education #adaptation #Karuk #Blackfeet #Hopi #Menominee #Hawaii #TraditionalEcologicalKnowledge #conservation #protection #preservation #sustainability #resilience #CostaBoutsikaris #InhabitFilms #docu-films
 

The forgotten oil ads that told us climate change was nothing


The Guardian

Since the 1980s, fossil fuel firms have run ads touting climate denial messages – many of which they’d now like us to forget. Here’s our visual guide.

Why is meaningful action to avert the climate crisis proving so difficult? It is, at least in part, because of ads.

The fossil fuel industry has perpetrated a multi-decade, multibillion dollar disinformation, propaganda and lobbying campaign to delay climate action by confusing the public and policymakers about the climate crisis and its solutions. This has involved a remarkable array of advertisements – with headlines ranging from “Lies they tell our children” to “Oil pumps life” – seeking to convince the public that the climate crisis is not real, not human-made, not serious and not solvable. The campaign continues to this day. (...)

Complete article




Tags: #capitalism #environment #pollution #waste #climate #climate change #climate crisis #cop26 #global warming #aur pollution #neoliberalism #market fundamentalism #inequality #cerrado #desert #rivers #amazon #co2 #nox #fossil fuel #deforestation #brazil #brasil #flooding #heat dome #extreme weather #forest fires #media #carbon footprint #oil industry #lobby #desinformation #economic growth #consumerism #citizen #protest #Fridays for Future #Green New Deal Rising #Extinction Rebellion
 

The forgotten oil ads that told us climate change was nothing


The Guardian

Since the 1980s, fossil fuel firms have run ads touting climate denial messages – many of which they’d now like us to forget. Here’s our visual guide.

Why is meaningful action to avert the climate crisis proving so difficult? It is, at least in part, because of ads.

The fossil fuel industry has perpetrated a multi-decade, multibillion dollar disinformation, propaganda and lobbying campaign to delay climate action by confusing the public and policymakers about the climate crisis and its solutions. This has involved a remarkable array of advertisements – with headlines ranging from “Lies they tell our children” to “Oil pumps life” – seeking to convince the public that the climate crisis is not real, not human-made, not serious and not solvable. The campaign continues to this day. (...)

Complete article




Tags: #capitalism #environment #pollution #waste #climate #climate change #climate crisis #cop26 #global warming #aur pollution #neoliberalism #market fundamentalism #inequality #cerrado #desert #rivers #amazon #co2 #nox #fossil fuel #deforestation #brazil #brasil #flooding #heat dome #extreme weather #forest fires #media #carbon footprint #oil industry #lobby #desinformation #economic growth #consumerism #citizen #protest #Fridays for Future #Green New Deal Rising #Extinction Rebellion
 

Mysteries of massive #holes forming in Siberian #permafrost unlocked by scientists


source: https://edition.cnn.com/2021/02/17/world/siberia-craters-arctic-climate-change-scn/index.html
The craters are thought to be linked to #climate change.
#Siberia #warming #environment #future #warming #mystery #news
 

Mysteries of massive #holes forming in Siberian #permafrost unlocked by scientists


source: https://edition.cnn.com/2021/02/17/world/siberia-craters-arctic-climate-change-scn/index.html
The craters are thought to be linked to #climate change.
#Siberia #warming #environment #future #warming #mystery #news
 

The Problem with Solar Energy in Africa


#environment #energy #climate

 

Enel CEO: 'Clean electricity will power 99% of Europe’s transport and heating by 2050 — and this is how it will work' | Recharge


#environment #energy #climate

There are several arguments that are often used to explain why the world cannot be fully powered by clean electricity:

1) Power grids will not be able to cope with the increased demand for heating and transport;

2) Wind and solar projects cannot be built fast enough to replace existing fossil-fuel power plants and meet the increased electricity demand;

3) Wind and solar is intermittent, so there won’t be enough electricity available when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining;

4) When there are a lot of wind and solar farms on a grid, supply will frequently exceed demand, leading to low or negative power prices, so renewables projects won’t be profitable and therefore won’t get built.

But Francesco Starace, chief executive of Italian power giant Enel — Europe’s largest electricity company by market capitalisation and Ebitda — believes that none of these arguments are valid, and tells Recharge how all these potential problems will be resolved.

->
 

Enel CEO: 'Clean electricity will power 99% of Europe’s transport and heating by 2050 — and this is how it will work' | Recharge


#environment #energy #climate

There are several arguments that are often used to explain why the world cannot be fully powered by clean electricity:

1) Power grids will not be able to cope with the increased demand for heating and transport;

2) Wind and solar projects cannot be built fast enough to replace existing fossil-fuel power plants and meet the increased electricity demand;

3) Wind and solar is intermittent, so there won’t be enough electricity available when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining;

4) When there are a lot of wind and solar farms on a grid, supply will frequently exceed demand, leading to low or negative power prices, so renewables projects won’t be profitable and therefore won’t get built.

But Francesco Starace, chief executive of Italian power giant Enel — Europe’s largest electricity company by market capitalisation and Ebitda — believes that none of these arguments are valid, and tells Recharge how all these potential problems will be resolved.

->
 

Stop…


#Climate #Fridays-for-Future #Change




The post Stop… appeared first on Lard Wants World Peace
Stop…
 

COP26: Document leak reveals nations lobbying to change key climate report - BBC News


#politics #environment #climate
The leak reveals Saudi Arabia, Japan and Australia are among countries asking the UN to play down the need to move rapidly away from fossil fuels.
I see the point for Saudi Arabia or eventually Australia, but Japan? They're importing 100% of their fossil fuels, so what's the point really?
 

COP26: Document leak reveals nations lobbying to change key climate report - BBC News


#politics #environment #climate
The leak reveals Saudi Arabia, Japan and Australia are among countries asking the UN to play down the need to move rapidly away from fossil fuels.
I see the point for Saudi Arabia or eventually Australia, but Japan? They're importing 100% of their fossil fuels, so what's the point really?
 

Solving the #Climate #Crisis Requires the End of #Capitalism


By Jeremy Lent

The global conversation regarding climate change has, for the most part, ignored the elephant in the room. ... That elephant is called capitalism, and it is high time to face the fact that, as long as capitalism remains the dominant economic system of our globalized world, the climate crisis won’t be resolved.

As the crucial UN climate talks known as #COP26 approach in early November, the public is becoming increasingly aware that the stakes have never been higher. What were once ominous warnings of future climate shocks wrought by wildfires, floods, and droughts have now become a staple of the daily news. Yet governments are failing to meet their own emissions pledges from the Paris agreement six years ago, which were themselves acknowledged to be inadequate. Increasingly, respected Earth scientists are warning, not just about the devastating effects of climate breakdown on our daily lives, but about the potential collapse of civilization itself unless we drastically change direction.

And yet, even as humanity faces perhaps the greatest existential crisis in its species’ history, the public debate on climate barely mentions the underlying economic system that brought us to this point and which continues to drive us toward the precipice. Ever since its emergence in the seventeenth century, with the creation of the first limited liability shareholder-owned corporations, capitalism has been premised on viewing the planet as a resource to exploit — its overriding objective to maximize profits from that exploitation as rapidly and extensively as possible. Current mainstream strategies to resolve our twin crises of climate breakdown and ecological overshoot without changing the underlying system of growth-based global capitalism are structurally inadequate.

The idea of “green growth” is promulgated by many development consultants, and is even incorporated in the UN’s official plan for “sustainable development,” but has been shown to be an illusion. Ecomodernists, and others who stand to profit from growth in the short-term, frequently make the argument that, through technological innovation, aggregate global economic output can become “absolutely decoupled” from resource use and carbon emissions — permitting limitless growth on a finite planet. Careful rigorous analysis, though, shows that this hasn’t happened so far, and even the most wildly aggressive assumptions for greater efficiency would still lead to unsustainable consumption of global resources.

The primary reason for this derives ultimately from the nature of capitalism itself. Under capitalism — which has now become the default global economic context for virtually all human enterprise — efficiency improvements intended to reduce resource usage inevitably become launchpads for further exploitation, leading paradoxically to an increase, rather than decrease, in consumption.

As the crucial UN climate talks known as COP26 approach in early November, the public is becoming increasingly aware that the stakes have never been higher. What were once ominous warnings of future climate shocks wrought by wildfires, floods, and droughts have now become a staple of the daily news. Yet governments are failing to meet their own emissions pledges from the Paris agreement six years ago, which were themselves acknowledged to be inadequate. Increasingly, respected Earth scientists are warning, not just about the devastating effects of climate breakdown on our daily lives, but about the potential collapse of civilization itself unless we drastically change direction.

And yet, even as humanity faces perhaps the greatest existential crisis in its species’ history, the public debate on climate barely mentions the underlying economic system that brought us to this point and which continues to drive us toward the precipice. Ever since its emergence in the seventeenth century, with the creation of the first limited liability shareholder-owned corporations, capitalism has been premised on viewing the planet as a resource to exploit — its overriding objective to maximize profits from that exploitation as rapidly and extensively as possible. Current mainstream strategies to resolve our twin crises of climate breakdown and ecological overshoot without changing the underlying system of growth-based global capitalism are structurally inadequate.

The idea of “green growth” is promulgated by many development consultants, and is even incorporated in the UN’s official plan for “sustainable development,” but has been shown to be an illusion. Ecomodernists, and others who stand to profit from growth in the short-term, frequently make the argument that, through technological innovation, aggregate global economic output can become “absolutely decoupled” from resource use and carbon emissions — permitting limitless growth on a finite planet. Careful rigorous analysis, though, shows that this hasn’t happened so far, and even the most wildly aggressive assumptions for greater efficiency would still lead to unsustainable consumption of global resources.

The primary reason for this derives ultimately from the nature of capitalism itself. Under capitalism — which has now become the default global economic context for virtually all human enterprise — efficiency improvements intended to reduce resource usage inevitably become launchpads for further exploitation, leading paradoxically to an increase, rather than decrease, in consumption.

...

The relentless pursuit of profit growth above all other considerations is reflected in the world’s stock markets, where corporations are valued not by their benefit to society, but by investors’ expectations of their growth in future earnings. Similarly, when aggregated to national accounts, the main proxy used to measure the performance of politicians is growth in Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Although it is commonly assumed that GDP correlates with social welfare, this is not the case once basic material requirements have been met. GDP merely measures the rate at which society transforms nature and human activity into the monetary economy, regardless of the ensuing quality of life. Anything that causes economic activity of any kind, whether good or bad, adds to GDP. When researchers developed a benchmark called the Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI), which incorporates qualitative components of well-being, they discovered a dramatic divergence between the two measures. GPI peaked in 1978 and has been steadily falling ever since, even while GDP continues to accelerate.

+
Solving the Climate Crisis Requires the End of Capitalism
 
● NEWS ● #TheVerge #Environment ☞ #Google and #YouTube will cut off ad money for #climate change deniers
 

Where we're heading: my thoughts


#environment #climate #energy #socialism

first most probably we'll hit +2°C in 2030. Large parts of Middle East and Mediterranean will become nigh uninhabitable around then, and at the very least will see their agricultural output crash, while at the same time oil and gas production will collapse in several of these countries. Water availability is already extremely concerning in Jordan, Algeria, Iran, etc.

Therefore there will be very large wars (see Syria) everywhere, but with hundreds million of people concerned. There will be mass migration of unprecedented scale; tens and tens of millions of refugees will run towards Europe whatever it takes.

Of course European populations won't accept this situation, so most probable outcome is the rise of fascistic, militarised and racist societies all across Europe (it's already well under way).

In the meanwhile absolutely nothing effective will be done for climate, peace and democracy. Effective things: cut out drastically our hydrocarbons imports whatever it takes (it probably takes lots of nukes, BTW, if we want to be realistic). Some things are pretty simple, for instance get rid of oil and gas in housing and heating; that requires MUCH LESS money than the money that have been thrown away into windmills, and would save Europe globally tens of billions ANNUALLY so it would pay itself back in a few years. Of course, that requires HEAVY LONG-TERM GOVERNMENT PLANNING which is absolutely against EU delirious dogmas about "free markets" and other neoliberal ideological nonsense.

This shit should have been done in the past 20 years, it could have been, very easily. Now, it's too late. Of course late is better than never, but we're hosed: heavily dependent upon the Russians, and largely investing in shit that should be decommissioned RIGHT NOW.

Reduced energy availability in Europe (already happening, have been going on for years now) will mean lower economic output. So Europe as a whole will be getting poorer and poorer, while becoming more violent and more depending on other hostile powers. I'm pretty sure we'll see large emigration from Europe towards China and the US.

Of course the only way out would be a concerted, clear, explicit, explained to the public degrowth policy. But this flies right in the face of everything that makes the world going nowadays; people imagine the end of the world more easily than the end of capitalism.

Regarding capitalism, its time is getting to an end. Remember Kropotkin: in rich, abundant environment (tropical islands, etc) competition drives evolution. There are many different species occupying many different niches. In poor, difficult environment (Siberian steppe, deserts etc) cooperation is much more important; there are only a few different species that occupy that space and tend to be less competitive than cooperative.

Capitalism was the competitive way of managing human societies as long as we were in an ever-expanding world of ever-expanding markets (started right about 1492). As it has soared for 500 years, most people naively believe that it can go on forever. But we've reached the end of always-increasing energy and resource availability and are entering in a world of increasing scarcity. In this world, capitalism and competition are poisonous. Socialism and cooperation are the only way to go. If we don't switch rapidly enough, we humans will be wiped out of this planet, simple as that.
 

Where we're heading: my thoughts


#environment #climate #energy #socialism

first most probably we'll hit +2°C in 2030. Large parts of Middle East and Mediterranean will become nigh uninhabitable around then, and at the very least will see their agricultural output crash, while at the same time oil and gas production will collapse in several of these countries. Water availability is already extremely concerning in Jordan, Algeria, Iran, etc.

Therefore there will be very large wars (see Syria) everywhere, but with hundreds million of people concerned. There will be mass migration of unprecedented scale; tens and tens of millions of refugees will run towards Europe whatever it takes.

Of course European populations won't accept this situation, so most probable outcome is the rise of fascistic, militarised and racist societies all across Europe (it's already well under way).

In the meanwhile absolutely nothing effective will be done for climate, peace and democracy. Effective things: cut out drastically our hydrocarbons imports whatever it takes (it probably takes lots of nukes, BTW, if we want to be realistic). Some things are pretty simple, for instance get rid of oil and gas in housing and heating; that requires MUCH LESS money than the money that have been thrown away into windmills, and would save Europe globally tens of billions ANNUALLY so it would pay itself back in a few years. Of course, that requires HEAVY LONG-TERM GOVERNMENT PLANNING which is absolutely against EU delirious dogmas about "free markets" and other neoliberal ideological nonsense.

This shit should have been done in the past 20 years, it could have been, very easily. Now, it's too late. Of course late is better than never, but we're hosed: heavily dependent upon the Russians, and largely investing in shit that should be decommissioned RIGHT NOW.

Reduced energy availability in Europe (already happening, have been going on for years now) will mean lower economic output. So Europe as a whole will be getting poorer and poorer, while becoming more violent and more depending on other hostile powers. I'm pretty sure we'll see large emigration from Europe towards China and the US.

Of course the only way out would be a concerted, clear, explicit, explained to the public degrowth policy. But this flies right in the face of everything that makes the world going nowadays; people imagine the end of the world more easily than the end of capitalism.

Regarding capitalism, its time is getting to an end. Remember Kropotkin: in rich, abundant environment (tropical islands, etc) competition drives evolution. There are many different species occupying many different niches. In poor, difficult environment (Siberian steppe, deserts etc) cooperation is much more important; there are only a few different species that occupy that space and tend to be less competitive than cooperative.

Capitalism was the competitive way of managing human societies as long as we were in an ever-expanding world of ever-expanding markets (started right about 1492). As it has soared for 500 years, most people naively believe that it can go on forever. But we've reached the end of always-increasing energy and resource availability and are entering in a world of increasing scarcity. In this world, capitalism and competition are poisonous. Socialism and cooperation are the only way to go. If we don't switch rapidly enough, we humans will be wiped out of this planet, simple as that.
 
What we humans need is not more articles about the #climate being fucked up, we know that now. What we need is more inspiration. We need goals, we need jobs which make us think that our work is pushing things in the right direction.
 
"It would be easy to look at the longstanding stalemate around #climate policy in the US, the world’s second biggest emitter and embattled superpower, as evidence that something more top-down is needed. Yet the failure isn’t one of too much democracy but too little. The US Senate empowers West Virginia’s Joe Manchin – a man elected by fewer than 300,000 people – to block the agenda of a president elected by more than 80 million. Climate-sceptical Republicans, backed by corporate interests, have attempted to gerrymander their way to electoral dominance, halting progressive climate action in its tracks. The fossil fuel industry can engulf lawmakers with lobbyists and virtually unlimited campaign donations to sway their votes. And as the Republican party’s leading lights flirt with authoritarians like Hungary’s prime minister, Viktor Orbán, comprehensive bipartisan climate action remains a pipe dream.

...

Countless millions will be displaced as temperatures soar, meaning national boundaries are bound to become more porous. Our conceptions of democracy should too, to see those living downstream from the west’s massive historical emissions as deserving of citizenship and a say in how – and how quickly – decarbonisation happens. “A proposal for curbing emissions from the developed world so that the billion individuals who live without electricity can enjoy its benefits would probably pass in a landslide in a world referendum,” the writer and filmmaker Astra Taylor has argued, “but it would likely fail if the vote were limited to people in the wealthiest countries.”

A best-case scenario detailed in their report by IPCC scientists, Shared Socioeconomic Economic Pathway 1, involves “more inclusive development” and unprecedented collaboration among the world’s governments to manage the global commons. In the less upbeat SSP3, “resurgent nationalism” and “concerns about competitiveness and security” start to emerge as countries go their own way in trying to adapt to and (more rarely) mitigate rising temperatures.

Roads away from democracy all lead to climate chaos. There’s no easy alternative on offer of course. The illiberal right is ascending much faster than the socialist left that has long sought to extend democracy into political systems, homes, and workplaces. The best hope in the short term is for a popular front to browbeat the middling centrists who claim to “believe science” into actually acting on it, and beating back the illiberal right accordingly."
 
"It would be easy to look at the longstanding stalemate around #climate policy in the US, the world’s second biggest emitter and embattled superpower, as evidence that something more top-down is needed. Yet the failure isn’t one of too much democracy but too little. The US Senate empowers West Virginia’s Joe Manchin – a man elected by fewer than 300,000 people – to block the agenda of a president elected by more than 80 million. Climate-sceptical Republicans, backed by corporate interests, have attempted to gerrymander their way to electoral dominance, halting progressive climate action in its tracks. The fossil fuel industry can engulf lawmakers with lobbyists and virtually unlimited campaign donations to sway their votes. And as the Republican party’s leading lights flirt with authoritarians like Hungary’s prime minister, Viktor Orbán, comprehensive bipartisan climate action remains a pipe dream.

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Countless millions will be displaced as temperatures soar, meaning national boundaries are bound to become more porous. Our conceptions of democracy should too, to see those living downstream from the west’s massive historical emissions as deserving of citizenship and a say in how – and how quickly – decarbonisation happens. “A proposal for curbing emissions from the developed world so that the billion individuals who live without electricity can enjoy its benefits would probably pass in a landslide in a world referendum,” the writer and filmmaker Astra Taylor has argued, “but it would likely fail if the vote were limited to people in the wealthiest countries.”

A best-case scenario detailed in their report by IPCC scientists, Shared Socioeconomic Economic Pathway 1, involves “more inclusive development” and unprecedented collaboration among the world’s governments to manage the global commons. In the less upbeat SSP3, “resurgent nationalism” and “concerns about competitiveness and security” start to emerge as countries go their own way in trying to adapt to and (more rarely) mitigate rising temperatures.

Roads away from democracy all lead to climate chaos. There’s no easy alternative on offer of course. The illiberal right is ascending much faster than the socialist left that has long sought to extend democracy into political systems, homes, and workplaces. The best hope in the short term is for a popular front to browbeat the middling centrists who claim to “believe science” into actually acting on it, and beating back the illiberal right accordingly."
 
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