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Items tagged with: GoT

This is so good!! I'm still shocked after seeing Brad Paisley rocking out. 😮 #GoT
#GoT
 
I trust that the owners of Kit Kat are hard at work making a variant of their "You're not yourself when you're hungry" ad campaign, featuring a certain #GoT character.
#GoT
 
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Seriously. Don't get me wrong, I still loved Dani.... it's just a shame she lost all of the people who reminded her that everyone that wasn't her wasn't always "bad people." #GoT
#GoT
 
Sansa really did have some of the best clothes. Saving this post so I can go through all the stills later for costume ideas. :) #GoT #ArtReferences #ArtInspiration #Costuming
 
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#GOT #SPOILERS Discussion Post time! Be warned, all ye who enter here, for here there be spoilers!

Last chance...
....
.....
......
.......

OK.

So that wasn't what I expected with King Bran the Broken. Kind of makes sense though, even if I was hoping it would be Jon in the end. There was too much conflict around what he did though... he probably wouldn't have wanted the constant reminder that he killed Dany in order to get there.

In the end, everyone who survived actually got what they wanted, really, to the point that it felt weird to have the episode tied up with relatively happy endings.

And now everyone can STFU about Jon and his wolf... because if the wolf had actually stayed with Jon he'd probably be dead now from trying to protect him. So there. :P

Poor Varys... in the end he never got to see his goals come to fruition as a good person took the throne for the people.
 

I Got a Knuth Check for 0x$3.00


HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19948517
Posted by Supermighty (karma: 2096)
Post stats: Points: 185 - Comments: 60 - 2019-05-18T17:16:38Z

\#HackerNews #0x300 #check #for #got #knuth
HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 143 - Loop: 99 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 52
 
When I see that Twitter is filled with all of this geek rage because they couldn't believe what happened because of a certain character on #GoT last night I keep thinking of this classic scene from The Man With Two Brains.

How could that character do that? I don't know... let's re-watch the past seven seasons and take a look at all the signs. (rolls eyes)

#GoT
 
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As everyone goes on about Daenerys Targaryen drinking Starbucks, let us not forget that Stannis Baratheon took so long to die in the woods that he had to make sure he could charge his laptop. #GoT
#GoT
 

Chinese Spies Got the NSA’s Hacking Tools, and Used Them for Attacks


HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19845085
Posted by tysone (karma: 10479)
Post stats: Points: 164 - Comments: 64 - 2019-05-06T23:50:42Z

\#HackerNews #and #attacks #chinese #for #got #hacking #nsas #spies #the #them #tools #used
HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 130 - Loop: 49 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 196

The New York Times: How Chinese Spies Got the N.S.A.’s Hacking Tools, and Used Them for Attacks (By NICOLE PERLROTH, DAVID E. SANGER and SCOTT SHANE)

 

I got control of my spending with some no-code services and 100 lines of Python


HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19833881
Posted by jcp2fa (karma: 47)
Post stats: Points: 106 - Comments: 42 - 2019-05-05T17:35:02Z

\#HackerNews #100 #and #control #got #lines #no-code #python #services #some #spending #with
HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 84 - Loop: 226 - Rank min: 80 - Author rank: 235
 

JetBlue explains to a passenger how it got a photo of her face


HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19812557
Posted by wizeman (karma: 207)
Post stats: Points: 140 - Comments: 69 - 2019-05-02T20:32:55Z

\#HackerNews #explains #face #got #her #how #jetblue #passenger #photo
HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 116 - Loop: 147 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 40
In this Twitter exchange, jetBlue explains to a passenger how it got a photo of her face -- from the DHS
 
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Thankfully my TV was up to the task and The Long Night has been seen. If anyone wants to talk about #GOT and the episode, feel free to comment., I've got ideas and thoughts, but I am going to keep them to the comments section so as not to bug people with spoilers.
#GOT
 
I just realised that Bran Stark's direwolf Summer is almost certainly undead now. Hopefully, some of the Others are taking turns bringing him for White Walkies.

#got
#got
 

Things Got Weird for Stablecoin Tether


HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19759081
Posted by jnordwick (karma: 2125)
Post stats: Points: 133 - Comments: 105 - 2019-04-26T16:14:29Z

\#HackerNews #for #got #stablecoin #tether #things #weird
HackerNewsBot debug: Calculated post rank: 123 - Loop: 172 - Rank min: 100 - Author rank: 19
 
#GOT
 
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I still believe that Jamie's cursed nickname will come back full circle... but I swear if someone doesn't survive to kill Cersei I'm going to be so pissed. #got
#got
 
This is awesome!! 😂😂😂 #GoT
#GoT
 

I got tired of PHP and Perl, so I tried bash


Web framework in Bash. Contribute to nerdgeneration/www.sh development by creating an account on GitHub.
Article word count: 34

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19649761
Posted by nerdgeneration (karma: 93)
Post stats: Points: 141 - Comments: 68 - 2019-04-12T22:53:28Z

\#HackerNews #and #bash #got #perl #php #tired #tried
Article content:

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Amazon bought Eero for $97M and employees still got screwed


From hardware darling to hard luck.
Article word count: 2225

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19587478
Posted by poopaway (karma: 50)
Post stats: Points: 111 - Comments: 78 - 2019-04-05T22:06:55Z

\#HackerNews #97m #amazon #and #bought #eero #employees #for #got #screwed #still
Article content:




When Amazon announced [1]a deal to acquire Eero, the maker of a [2]groundbreaking WiFi system, it sounded like a classic Silicon Valley success story: a promising startup is acquired by the biggest bidder in the land, and everyone rolls around in cash. But that is not this story. This story is about investors losing tens of millions of dollars and dozens of employees left with meaningless stock.

According to confidential documents viewed by Mashable, [3]Amazon acquired Eero for $97 million. [4]Eero executives brought home multi-million dollar bonuses and eight-figure salary increases. Everyone else, however, didn’t fare quite so well. Investors took major hits, and the Amazon acquisition rendered Eero stock worthless: $0.03 per share, down from a common stock high of $3.54 in July 2017. It typically would have cost around $3 for employees to exercise their stock, meaning they would actually lose money if they tried to cash out.

Former and current Eero employees who chose not to exercise those options are now empty-handed. And those who did exercise options, investing their financial faith in the company, have lost money.

SEE ALSO: [5]Amazon plans to offer satellite-powered internet

Meanwhile, the Eero execs who stay to help Amazon wage its war for smart home domination will take home around $30 million.

The circumstances surrounding Eero’s sale to Amazon speaks to how exceedingly [6]difficult it is to compete in the smart home market. Creating hardware takes time and [7]money, the sort of money that is usually found in the pockets of tech giants. If you want to win in the product sector, you want to be on the side of the giants. And even then, your win may still be a loss.

Great expectations

At its inception, Eero checked off all the boxes for Silicon Valley: a “disruptive” product, chummy co-founders with Stanford pedigrees, an [8]origin story that started in an apartment, and big [9]promises about how its wireless mesh router system would reinvent home WiFi with cutting-edge technology. It even had a sleek, minimalist design.

In 2016, Eero’s system hit the shelves. Reviewers, [10]including at Mashable[11], were delighted by the performance and the packaging. Three months after the successful product launch, it had a [12]valuation of over $277 million.

Eeroʼs primary product is a "mesh wireless router," which changes the way internet access is delivered throughout the house, resulting in coverage that is faster and more consistent. Instead of one central modem and router duo, mesh WiFi systems communicate between multiple devices placed throughout a home, which allows the fastest WiFi signals to reach through more physical barriers. Installing and setting up Eero is simple — no surly cable guy required — and the system is managed via an app on your smartphone.

[13]Eeroʼs home WiFi system.

Eeroʼs home WiFi system.

Image: EERO

Eero may have been first to mesh WiFi, but competition came fast. Multiple companies including Luma and NetGear launched similar products in the next year.

According to former Eero employees, the biggest challenge came from Google. The tech giant launched its own mesh network, [14]Google Wifi, in late 2016, for just $299. At the time, Eero was selling for $500.

The company tried to remain a step ahead and diversify — most notably with Hive, a smart home security system — but then Google dropped a bomb: a similar product called Nest Secure. Soon after, Eero abandoned Hive, leading to a period of malaise and confusion.

“The day they killed [Hive]was the day the company changed,” said a former employee.

After Eero employees returned from the holidays, 20 percent of the staff was cut. Next came massive attrition. An ex-employee described it as a period of “desperate fear.” Morale was so low that HR disabled group emailing and prohibited employees from sending out goodbye emails to say they were leaving.

Then the really big news dropped.

Movin’ on up?

On February 11, Eero announced to the public that Amazon had acquired the company. Rumors about the specifics of the deal spread quickly. But any excitement dissipated once employees realized that neither Eero nor Amazon was disclosing a price. That discomfort turned to anger as the documents started to arrive.

"I was really surprised when the announcement came, and I knew instantly it was bad," one ex-employee said. "When they don’t announce the price, it’s not good. What I didn’t know was how bad it actually was."

Employees tried to guess from news reports and social media what the deal meant for them. When the stock price leaked, some ex-employees breathed a sigh of relief that they didn’t exercise their options in the first place. Others were left with worthless stock and disappointment.

The letter, dated February 15, gave employees four days to decide what to do with their Eero shares. Some even received the letter on or after the deadline.

This would be the last communication that most ex-employees would receive from Eero. But those who chose to purchase or exercise their stock received a "phonebook-sized" packet of dense financial information — including acquisition terms that tell a different story than Amazon and Eero’s glowing announcement.

"I was far less salty about the situation before I got this document," an ex-employee said. "I don’t begrudge the executives their payout, but I feel like they could have taken a little bit less to not screw the employees who spent their own money because they believed in the company."

First, the documents (reviewed by Mashable with financial experts) open with a reiteration about the stock price from CEO and co-founder Nick Weaver.

"Unfortunately, the transaction will not result in the financial return we all hoped for," Weaver wrote in the introduction.

It revealed that the final sale price was $97 million. [15]Crunchbase reports that Eero took $90 million in venture capital (the Wall Street Journal put the number at $100 million). PitchBook, a highly accurate source of VC information, claimed a final $40 million Series D fundraising round from December 2017 brought that number up to $138 million. Eero declined to comment, instead pointing to a [16]March 12 blog post confirming the sale.

An additional $10 million debt line Eero took out brings the total money put into the company at $148 million — 150 percent of the Amazon sale price.
"I knew instantly it was bad."

“One obvious way you can judge whether it was a great exit or not is if the exit valuation is lower than the amount of capital that was invested in the startup,” Rob Chandra, a partner at Avid Park Ventures, and lecturer at UC Berkeley’s Haas business school, explained. "So itʼs not a great exit."

Still, $97 million is nothing to sneeze at. It looks, at first glance, like the company may have given investors something close to what they’d put in, while providing jobs at Amazon for the remaining employees.

But thatʼs not the case. The story that the financial documents tell indicates that things turned out even worse for investors — and yes, for employees — than they might look.

The documents state that after transaction costs and debt, the actual price will be closer to $54.6 million. That means that Amazon is covering around $40 million of the debt that Eero owes. Ex-employees believe the debt to be from hardware manufacturing costs, since they said that Eero took on corporate financing to actually manufacture the products. Jeff Scheinrock, a professor at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, and an experienced investor and entrepreneur himself, agreed that this was likely the case.

"What this says about it was that Eero was cash strapped," Scheinrock said. "A lot of this money is going to pay off debts. They were having difficulty and probably couldn’t raise additional money, so they had to look for an exit."

That left about $54 million for employees and investors. By looking at stock prices listed in the acquisition documents, the amount raised in each funding round, and the amount of shares each VC received in these rounds, you can get a good idea of the investors’ losses. Ultimately, thanks to a “last in, first out” philosophy, Eero’s Series D investors, led by Qualcomm, will recoup 84 percent of their investments. The seed round and Series A-C investors will all get back 31 cents on the dollar.

But not everyone involved with Eero lost.

Amazon created a "Management and Employee Retention Plan" for key Eero executives. As part of this plan, the documents state that it is allocating 10 percent of the "actual consideration" (the $54 million transaction price) to executive bonuses and pay increases, even if that meant bigger losses for investors.

Ten executives are getting the majority of that money. The three co-founders — Nick Weaver, Nathaniel Hardison, and Timothy A. Schallich (who goes by Amos) — plus other company executives and affiliates, will collectively receive ~$3.7 million in cash as a "transaction bonus."

The ten executives will also receive between ~$29 and ~$23 million in salary increases, retention and yearly bonuses that vest over three years (for a potential total of $32.6 million). These are all financial incentives for what Amazon apparently views as the core Eero team to stay on and build the product.

“Eero is a customer-focused, inventive team that has quickly developed an impressive WiFi solution that makes technologies at home just work,” an Amazon spokesperson told Mashable when asked why the company acquired Eero.

Still, ex-employees wonder if there might have been more money for stockholders had the executives not been granted so much in cash and bonuses.

[17]Executives could get up to $32 million in buyout bonuses.

Executives could get up to $32 million in buyout bonuses.

Image: Bob Al-Greene / Mashable

"Theyʼre not valuing the company very much for the past contributions," Avid Park Ventures partner Rob Chandra said. "Theyʼre really valuing it more in terms of what itʼs going to do in the future."

Amazon, when asked, said it values Eero for “both."

(Hard)ware

The key to Eeroʼs future is also what contributed to its failures.

Many outlets, [18]including Mashable, speculated that Amazonʼs acquisition of Eero had everything to do with the tech giantʼs plans and desire to increase its dominance in the home. When Eero announced the deal on March 12, it mentioned more communication between Alexa and Eero devices. One ex-employee said this was something Eero was already discussing in 2018, but that it didnʼt make practical sense at the time.

The Googles and Amazons of the world have the “cash, the size, the structure, to buy markets,” Scheinrock said. "If you’re just a single market company [like Eero], it’s very hard to compete with somebody who’s a giant.”

Hardware startups require a lot of cash, and technological progress can render a product obsolete before it has a chance to take off. Nearly all (97 percent) of the 400 hardware startups tracked in a [19]2017 report from CB Insights either died or became "zombies," companies that survive for awhile with VC money, but eventually fizzle out.

“When you do it right, there’s a pathway to building extremely valuable hardware companies that have competitive differentiation. Companies that do achieve this can win at scale and aim to go public,” Seth Winterroth, a partner at Eclipse Ventures, said. “But it’s hard in the home right now for startups. The market is extremely fragmented, there’s a lot of noise, and you’re competing against giant tech companies looking to ‘own’ the consumer at home.”

When asked about whether Amazon thinks its presence makes life harder for small hardware companies, a spokesperson instead focused on how its investments help “developers and device makers of all sizes create products.”

The bar for success in home hardware tech is incredibly high — but it can be reached. According to Winterroth, Peloton is a notable example. The indoor bike manufacturer created a product useful and compelling enough to stand and grow, profitably, on its own. On the other hand, many players have fallen at the hands of an overcrowded hardware market populated with well-funded super players. Remember [20]Lighthouse? How about [21]Jibo?
"You either get bought, or you die."

Winterroth points out that Google and Amazon’s race for dominance in the home also creates massive opportunity. Between Alexa, Siri, Google Assistant, and all of their physical iterations, there’s no clearly dominant smart home system. But that also makes these larger players desperate to compete. Home devices are in part a marketing strategy to make customers live their lives — including shopping, watching, and using the internet — entirely through the device’s company. So, as the ex-Eero employees pointed out, they are willing to sell these products much more cheaply than a startup can afford to do.

“If you do not have a product thatʼs an order of magnitude better than what’s out there, youʼre being drowned out by the marketing coverage and go-to-market strategies of big companies,” Winterroth said. “It’s a very high barrier for small companies to overcome.”

To actually compete against these companies, the product itself must appear instantly valuable for consumers, enter the market at the right time, execute perfectly, and be a conduit to subscription and software services. For most companies — including Eero — that’s too high a bar to reach.

"I just think that the growing consensus is that hardware is a losing bet, especially when you’ve got all the big boys undercutting you," an ex-employee said. "There’s just no winning with hardware. You either get bought, or you die.”

[22]Uploads%252fvideo uploaders%252fdistribution thumb%252fimage%252f91058%252fd2046803 8936 430f 9ec1 2800a6c595b9.jpg%252foriginal.jpg?signature=uktfk2pvgodt8y4ia4s 2kyicy0=&source=https%3a%2f%2fblueprint api production.s3.amazonaws

References

Visible links
1. https://mashable.com/article/amazon-acquires-eero/
2. https://mashable.com/2015/02/03/eero-wifi-network/#OwxH1AozZ8qq
3. https://mashable.com/category/amazon/
4. https://mashable.com/category/eero/
5. http://mashable.com/article/amazon-plans-to-offer-satellite-powered-internet?utm_cid=a-seealso
6. https://www.wired.com/story/why-do-startups-fail-because-hardware-is-hard/
7. https://www.forbes.com/sites/daveevans/2018/11/14/hardware-startups-are-only-as-successful-as-their-cash-flow-management/#589f62835f60
8. https://www.cnbc.com/2016/09/16/start-up-lessons-from-a-ceo-who-went-from-his-living-room-to-best-buy-in-2-years.html
9. https://mashable.com/2015/02/03/eero-wifi-network/
10. https://mashable.com/2016/02/23/eero-home-super-charged-wi-fi/
11. https://www.forbes.com/sites/aarontilley/2016/05/25/wifi-router-maker-eero-raises-50-million/#55491731221a
12. https://www.quora.com/What-is-eero-wifis-valuation-after-their-latest-funding
14. https://mashable.com/2016/12/06/google-wifi-review/
15. https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/eero#section-acquisitions
16. https://blog.eero.com/as-we-join-the-amazon-family-were-accelerating-our-mission-to-deliver-perfect-connectivity-in-every-home/
18. https://mashable.com/article/amazon-acquires-eero/#0mpqJMauxPqx
19. https://www.cbinsights.com/research/report/hardware-startups-failure-success/
20. https://venturebeat.com/2018/12/19/playground-ventures-backed-lighthouse-shuts-down-offers-refunds-to-customers/
21. https://mashable.com/article/jibo-robot-announces-own-death/

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Cookie Warning Shenanigans Have Got to Stop


This will be short, ranty and to the point: these warnings are getting ridiculous: I know, tell you something you don't know! The whole ugly issue reared its head again on the weekend courtesy of the…

HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19381063
Posted by weinzierl (karma: 7252)
Post stats: Points: 158 - Comments: 61 - 2019-03-13T17:24:06Z

\#HackerNews #cookie #got #have #shenanigans #stop #warning
Article content:




This will be short, ranty and to the point: these warnings are getting ridiculous:

I know, tell you something you donʼt know! The whole ugly issue reared its head again on the weekend courtesy of the story in this tweet:
I’m not sure if this makes it better or worse... “Cookie walls donʼt comply with GDPR, says Dutch DPA”: [1]https://t.co/p0koRdGrDB 

 — Troy Hunt (@troyhunt) [2]March 8, 2019

The reason I donʼt know if it makes it better or worse is that on the one hand, itʼs ridiculous that in a part of the world thatʼs more privacy-focused than most it essentially boils down to "take this cookie or no access for you" whilst on the other hand, the Dutch DPA somehow thinks that this makes any sense to (almost) anyone:
And the Dutch DPA’s guidance makes it clear internet visitors must be asked for permission in advance for any tracking software to be placed — such as third-party tracking cookies; tracking pixels; and browser fingerprinting tech — and that that permission must be freely obtained. Ergo, a free choice must be offered.

Is this really what we want? To continue chucking up cookie warnings to everyone and somehow expecting them to make an informed decision about the risks they present? 99% of people are going to click through them anyway (note: this is a purely fabricated figure based on the common-sense assumption that people will generally click through anything that gets in the way of perming the task they set out to complete in the first place). And honestly, how on earth is your average person going to make an informed decision on a message like this:
Iʼm sure its a good article though... It might have been nice to read it! [3]pic.twitter.com/95bpDtmjDO 

 — Paul Court (@MrPCourt) [4]March 8, 2019

Do you know how hard it is to explain OAuth to technical people, let alone the masses? Oh wait - itʼs not OAuth - itʼs Oath but even I didnʼt get that at first because nobody really reads these warnings anyway! And now that I have read it and I know itʼs Oath, what does that really mean? Oh look, a big blue button that will make it all go away and allow me to do what I came here for in the first place...

But say you are more privacy focused and you wanted to follow that link in the original tweet. Hereʼs your fix:

And if youʼre smart enough to actually understand what cookies are and be able to make an informed decision when prompted with a warning like TechCrunchʼs, then youʼre smart enough to know how to right click on a link and open it incognito. Or run an ad blocker. Or something like a [5]Pi-hole.

Or you move to Australia because apparently, we donʼt deserve the same levels or privacy down here. Or have I got that back to front and Europeans donʼt deserve the same slick UX experience as we get down here? You know, the one where you click on a link to read an article and you actually get to read the article!

So letʼs be European for a moment and see how that experience looks - letʼs VPN into Amsterdam and try to control my privacy on TechCrunch:

Are you fucking serious? This is what privacy looks like? Thatʼs 224 different ad networks that are considered "IAB Partners" (thatʼd be the [6]Interactive Advertising Bureau) and I can control which individual ones can set cookies. And thatʼs in addition to the 10 Oath foundational partners:

You canʼt disable any of those either by the look of it so yeah, no privacy on that front. But at least you can go and read their privacy policy, right? Sure, [7]Unrulyʼs is 3,967 words, [8]Facebookʼs is 4,498 words and [9]Zentrickʼs is another 3,805 words. Oh - and remember that you need to accept cookies on each one of those sites too and youʼre going to want to read about how they and their partners track you...

And the ridiculous thing about it is that tracking isnʼt entirely dependent on cookies anyway (and yes, I know the Dutch situation touched on browser fingerprinting in general too). Want to see a perfect example? Have a go of [10]Am I Unique and youʼll almost certainly be told that "Yes! You can be tracked!":

Over one million samples collected and yet somehow, I am a unique snowflake that can be identified across requests without a cookie in sight. How? Because even though Iʼm running the current version of Chrome on the current version of Windows, less than 0.1% of people have the same user agent string as me. Less than 0.1% of people also have their language settings the same as mine. Keep combining these unique attributes and you have a very unique fingerprint:

The list goes on well beyond that screen grab too - time zone, screen resolution and even the way the canvas element renders on the page. Itʼs kinda cool in a kinda creepy way.

And hereʼs the bit that really bugs me (ok, it all bugs me but this is the worst): how do we expect your normal everyday person to differentiate between cookie warnings and warnings like these:

I know what these are and you probably do too by virtue of being on this blog, but do you really think most people who have been conditioned to click through the warning thatʼs sitting between them and the content they wish to read understand the difference between this and a cookie warning? We literally have banks telling people just to ignore these warnings:
German bank [11]@comdirect recommends to just ignore the warning about an insecure connection in their online banking app. 

 Unbelievable... [12]@troyhunt [13]https://t.co/ROOol70OyB 

 — der JayJay (@jayjay_92) [14]November 26, 2018

So in summary, everyone clicks through cookie warnings anyway, if you read them you either canʼt understand what theyʼre saying or the configuration of privacy settings is a nightmare, depending on where you are in the world you either donʼt get privacy or you donʼt get UX hell, if you understand the privacy risks then itʼs easy to open links incognito or use an ad blocker, you can still be tracked anyway and finally, the whole thing is just conditioning people to make bad security choices. That is all.

[15]Privacy [16]Cookies

References

Visible links
1. https://t.co/p0koRdGrDB
2. https://twitter.com/troyhunt/status/1104153598458396672?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw
3. https://t.co/95bpDtmjDO
4. https://twitter.com/MrPCourt/status/1104156453349277697?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw
5. https://www.troyhunt.com/mmm-pi-hole/
6. https://www.iab.com/
7. https://unruly.co/privacy/#privacy-policy
8. https://www.facebook.com/policy.php
9. https://www.zentrick.com/privacy-policy/
10. https://amiunique.org/
11. https://twitter.com/comdirect?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw
12. https://twitter.com/troyhunt?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw
13. https://t.co/ROOol70OyB
14. https://twitter.com/jayjay_92/status/1067056789420720129?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw
15. https://www.troyhunt.com/tag/privacy/
16. https://www.troyhunt.com/tag/cookies/

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