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Why The Progressive Left Fits So Uncomfortably Within The Democratic Party




#Prograssive #politics #election2020
Why The Progressive Left Fits So Uncomfortably Within The Democratic Party
 
Please read the entire article. That is all.

"Fully Republican-controlled states have rejected the as-rewritten-by-John-Roberts Medicaid expansion not because it’s unpopular and doesn’t work, but because it’s popular and works. It’s a deeply revolting worldview, but it doesn’t suddenly vanish during a pandemic."

"And, of course, the next step is scapegoating."

Via Denialism as an ethos

#GOP #corruption #incompetence #cruelty #inequality #healthcare #election2020
Denialism as an ethos
 
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Quote of note:

"If a trillionaire suddenly decided to give $100,000 of their own money to every American, the GOP would stop them for fear that it might benefit one or two poor people who (they believe) is lazy and mooching and thus morally undeserving of the cash. Punishment takes priority over progress, every time. It's why an actual, functional Universal Basic Income package would never pass in this country — even if it was fiscally responsible, and ultimately reduced the National Debt, the GOP simply couldn't sleep if there was one single poor person who used it as an opportunity to sit back and relax. Greed is a vice reserved for the rich."

Via Bernie Sanders drops truths on the Senate floor about the Coronavirus Stimulus Package

Tweet via https://twitter.com/People4Bernie/status/1242989219598884865

#Bernie2020 #election2020 #FightThePower #inequality #MedicareForAll #COVID19 #coronavirus #pandemic
 
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Quote of note:

"If a trillionaire suddenly decided to give $100,000 of their own money to every American, the GOP would stop them for fear that it might benefit one or two poor people who (they believe) is lazy and mooching and thus morally undeserving of the cash. Punishment takes priority over progress, every time. It's why an actual, functional Universal Basic Income package would never pass in this country — even if it was fiscally responsible, and ultimately reduced the National Debt, the GOP simply couldn't sleep if there was one single poor person who used it as an opportunity to sit back and relax. Greed is a vice reserved for the rich."

Via Bernie Sanders drops truths on the Senate floor about the Coronavirus Stimulus Package

Tweet via https://twitter.com/People4Bernie/status/1242989219598884865

#Bernie2020 #election2020 #FightThePower #inequality #MedicareForAll #COVID19 #coronavirus #pandemic
 
Image/Photo
Quote of note:

"If a trillionaire suddenly decided to give $100,000 of their own money to every American, the GOP would stop them for fear that it might benefit one or two poor people who (they believe) is lazy and mooching and thus morally undeserving of the cash. Punishment takes priority over progress, every time. It's why an actual, functional Universal Basic Income package would never pass in this country — even if it was fiscally responsible, and ultimately reduced the National Debt, the GOP simply couldn't sleep if there was one single poor person who used it as an opportunity to sit back and relax. Greed is a vice reserved for the rich."

Via Bernie Sanders drops truths on the Senate floor about the Coronavirus Stimulus Package

Tweet via https://twitter.com/People4Bernie/status/1242989219598884865

#Bernie2020 #election2020 #FightThePower #inequality #MedicareForAll #COVID19 #coronavirus #pandemic
 
Inside a pro-Trump YouTube disinformation network that spans Vietnam to Bosnia

"The operation demonstrates how easy and cheap it is to exploit the opportunities tech platforms offer and hook audiences on videos about hot-button issues. In several cases, the channels amplified content from fringe, right-wing websites, like Patriot Pulse and American Patriot Daily. The channels employed simple yet effective techniques to evade platform safeguards. And though tech giants like Google and Facebook often take the brunt of the blame, this operation makes clear that smaller players in the internet ecosystem, like Fiverr, can be enablers of the process."

#election2020 #disinformation #propaganda #informationwarfare #cybersecurity #Russia #Trump
 

What this ProPublica piece fails to reveal is that Chicago is keeping those 20 Libraries open because it’s cheaper than what it would cost to house Chicago's 16,451 registered homeless students, about 4.5 percent of its student body


.
Homeless children have no internet access. That means they will be prevented from taking part in the Chicago Public School's online study program during the elongated school closings due to COVID-19.
As if those kids didn’t have it bad enough already. So Chicago’s mayor, Lori Lightfoot, is doing what she can to help those kids by keeping those 20 Libraries open. Everything is not always black and white.
.
ProPublica should have delved a little deeper to understand that during last fall's Chicago Teachers Union Strike, one of the teacher’s main demands was for the Chicago to provide housing for these deeply disadvantaged students. Mayor Lightfoot refused. It was because she had to negotiate where she could within budget constraints. Again, everything is not always black and white. Shame on you, ProPublica.

.



.
Here’s where having a Democrat in the Oval Office and a democrat-heavy Senate and House would make a world of difference. Instead of giving tax cuts to the 1% and multi billion dollar corporations, we could be helping cities like Chicago tackle this travesty of so many children being denied a chance at life.

No, we do not need a revolution to fix this. All we need is sane, humane people in key positions of government who do the right thing while keeping an eye on a balanced budget …. so we can keep doing the right thing.

Bernie helped ensure Hillary’s electoral defeat in 2016 and that is why things are as bad as they are today. Now, many of Bernie’s people are saying that they refuse to vote for Biden because they are furious, AGAIN, that Bernie isn’t going to be the nominee. If that happens, AGAIN, it will be on the shoulders of those immature, self-serving Bernie supporters that those homeless children in Chicago (and other cities) will remain homeless forever. Those who repeat 2016 had better not think for a minute that anyone is going to buy their lies about caring about people. Once was enough. Twice would be an insult to intelligence. If Sanders allows his followers to pull the same stunt, his name will be remembered in infamy. And he will deserve every trashing he gets from every historian who mentions his name. So will the generation who helped him. They will be remembered as the antithesis of "The Greatest Generation.”

#mywork #socialism #socialists #capitalism #dissent #Politics #Democrats #Election2020 #Warren #Sanders #FauxDisagreement #AmericaHatesProgressives #progressives #centrist #FollowTheMoney #DSA #Democrats #Liberals #gop #diaspora #friendica #USpolitics #Bernie2020 #FightThePower #election2020 ShelennAyres @Shelenn Ayres
 
Of course he is.

Biden Is Still Lying About His Positions on Social Security Cuts, the Bankruptcy Bill, and More

"Former Vice President Joe Biden told at least five lies during Sunday night’s one-one-one Democratic presidential debate with his last remaining opponent, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. Networks and outlets from CNN to Politico covered the debate as a win for Biden."

#election2020 #truth #lies
 
Russian election meddling is back -- via Ghana and Nigeria -- and in your feeds

"The Russian trolls are back -- and once again trying to poison the political atmosphere in the United States ahead of this year's elections. But this time they are better disguised and more targeted, harder to identify and track. And they have found an unlikely home, far from Russia itself."

"In 2016, much of the trolling aimed at the US election operated from an office block in St. Petersburg, Russia. A months-long CNN investigation has discovered that, in this election cycle, at least part of the campaign has been outsourced -- to trolls in the west African nations of Ghana and Nigeria."

"They have focused almost exclusively on racial issues in the US, promoting black empowerment and often displaying anger towards white Americans. The goal, according to experts who follow Russian disinformation campaigns, is to inflame divisions among Americans and provoke social unrest."

#election2020 #Russia #disinformation #propaganda #informationwarfare #cybersecurity
 
Quote of note:

"Global health emergencies like this lay bare the damage dome to social infrastructure over the years by stripping it bare of funding. The safety net for stuff like this has been fatally crippled in the U.S., people are just starting to realize it because the problems have been ignored and paper over by politicians for years. 'Don't pay attention to the man behind the curtain!'" - Paul Ferguson, Tacoma, Washington USA

#election2020 #COVID19 #coronavirus #pandemic #socialjustice #healthcare #GreatSociety
 
Sanders most popular Democratic candidate in exit polls among ‘swing voters’

"Where exit polls are conducted, Bernie Sanders is the favored Democratic candidate in 13 out of the 16 states. This means that those Americans who are independent voters or 'swing voters' are more likely to vote for Sanders as opposed to former Vice President Joe Biden come November."

#Bernie2020 #election2020 #FightThePower
Sanders most popular Democratic candidate in exit polls among ‘swing voters’
 
Random stuff.

"The campaign shuffle is an acknowledgment that while Biden has had a remarkable recent run of victories — at least 15 of the past 21 contests — his operation was not up to the challenge posed by President Trump if Biden wins the nomination."

#election2020
 
Quote of note:

"Some people mistakenly believe that Republicans were not engaged and voting in ’18 or at least were not as enthusiastic as during elections past. Untrue. They turned out in droves. It’s just that *we* outnumber them and we voted, uh, harder. It’s worth remembering that when you’re thinking about sitting this one out because containment and eradication of malarkey is not your top issue."

Via Republicans Are Champing at the Bit to Own the Libs (Again)

#election2020
Republicans Are Champing at the Bit to Own the Libs (Again)
 
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Let me tell you why the fight has to continue:

Democratic socialists believe that both the economy and society should be run democratically—to meet public needs, not to make profits for a few. To achieve a more just society, many structures of our government and economy must be radically transformed through greater economic and social democracy so that ordinary Americans can participate in the many decisions that affect our lives.

Democracy and socialism go hand in hand. All over the world, wherever the idea of democracy has taken root, the vision of socialism has taken root as well—everywhere but in the United States. Because of this, many false ideas about socialism have developed in the US.

#inequality #election2020
 
Unsurprising, but FYI...

Russia Trying to Stoke U.S. Racial Tensions Before Election, Officials Say

"The Russian government has stepped up efforts to inflame racial tensions in the United States as part of its bid to influence November’s presidential election, including trying to incite violence by white supremacist groups and to stoke anger among African-Americans, according to seven American officials briefed on recent intelligence."

"Russia’s lead intelligence agency, the S.V.R., has apparently gone beyond 2016 methods of interference, when operatives tried to stoke racial animosity by creating fake Black Lives Matter groups and spreading disinformation to depress black voter turnout. Now, Russia is also trying to influence white supremacist groups, the officials said; they gave few details, but one official said federal investigators are examining how at least one neo-Nazi organization with ties to Russia is funded."

#Russia #propaganda #disinformation #informationwarfare #election2020 #cybersecurity #race

The New York Times: Russia Trying to Stoke U.S. Racial Tensions Before Election, Officials Say (By Julian E. Barnes and Adam Goldman)

 
Can't say we didn't see this coming a mile away...

'A slap in the face': AT&T workers upset jobs slashed despite Trump tax cuts

"It was not meant to be like this. Huge tax cuts, supported by AT&T, were meant to allow companies to hire more and pay better. But instead AT&T has cut 37,818 jobs in the US from when the Trump tax cut bill first went into effect in 2018 to the end of 2019, with more than 4,000 jobs cut in the last quarter of 2019, based on the company’s quarterly reports."

"The company strongly supported the tax cut bill and promised workers a $1,000 bonus ahead of the bill’s passage amid claims of a hiring spree."

"The bill, passed in December 2017, cut the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%, saving AT&T an estimated $21bn initially, with an estimated $3bn in annual savings. Despite AT&T’s promises to invest these savings back into their workforce, the company has shed the number of employees since the bill went into effect, while capital investments have declined. In 2018, AT&T’s capital investments declined to $21.25bn, and the company announced plans to reduce it further in 2020 to $20bn, while rolling out a three-year plan to spend $30bn on stock buybacks."

"For newly unemployed workers like Lorenzano that situation has added insult to deep injury."




#GOPTaxScam #election2020 #inequality #ATT
 
Quote of note:

"If they are living paycheck to paycheck and have no social support, it could be crushing."

Via Coronavirus quarantine: For some, missing work could be financially 'crushing'

#COVID19 #coronavirus #pandemic #inequality #healthcare #MedicareForAll #PaidSickLeave #election2020
 
Civil Rights Icon Jesse Jackson Endorses Bernie Sanders for President

"Civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. on Sunday endorsed 2020 Democratic presidential primary candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders and urged black voters to reject the 'moderate path' in favor of a progressive agenda that aims to actually meet the needs and demands of their communities."

"The endorsement from Jackson, who sought the Democratic nomination in 1984 and 1988, came just a day after the U.S. senator from Vermont held a rally in Chicago’s Grant Park attended by about 15,000 people. According to Sanders’ campaign, Jackson planned to speak Sunday at an event in Grand Rapids, Michigan."

#Bernie2020 #election2020 #FightThePower #MedicareForAll
Civil Rights Icon Jesse Jackson Endorses Bernie Sanders for President
 
Trump Is a Disaster for Abortion Rights — but Joe Biden Can’t Be Trusted to Fight for Choice

"Abortion rights will likely not survive another term under Trump. Even under a Democratic president, the current makeup of the Supreme Court will continue to pose a grave threat. That is the bleak terrain in which voters who care about reproductive rights need to consider the Democratic presidential nominees. They must look for someone who offers an unwavering commitment to not only protect the right to abortion, but to make the choice to terminate a pregnancy a readily available option for all."

"And that is what’s so concerning about the frontrunner, former Vice President Joe Biden, and his record on abortion rights. He is worse than inconsistent — and his rise should concern anyone who believes that reproductive rights and choice are essential to social justice."

#election2020 #choice #womenshealth #reproductiverights #abortionrights
 
‘It sounds insane, actually’: Democrats relive 2016 primary all over again

"One top contender is struggling to make inroads with African Americans. The other, establishment frontrunner is struggling to put him away. Michigan could bury a campaign — or revive it. A messy national convention looms in the distance."

"The 2020 Democratic primary is back where it was in 2016."




#DNC #election2020
 
Quote of note:

"'As the number of coronavirus cases mount in the US, experts are warning that the country is unusually vulnerable to the spread of the disease', the Financial Times reports."

"Public health officials and academics are concerned that a mix of high numbers of uninsured people, a lack of paid sick leave and a political class that has downplayed the threat could mean it spreads more quickly than in other countries.”

"The spread of coronavirus could be fuelled by patients reluctant to seek care because of the expense of the US healthcare system."

Via Why the U.S. Is So Vulnerable to Coronavirus

#Trump #Pence #GOP #corruption #incompetence #COVID19 #coronavirus #pandemic #FAIL #science #exploitation #healthcare #MedicareForAll #inequality #election2020
Why the U.S. Is So Vulnerable to Coronavirus
 
Fox News to host Sanders town hall ahead of crucial Michigan primary

"FOX News will host a second town hall with 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on Monday in Detroit, the network announced on Friday."

"The town hall for Sanders comes ahead of a crucial primary in Michigan, where Sanders and former Vice President Joe Biden will vie for the states's 125 pledged delegate haul."

#Michigan #Bernie2020 #election2020 #FightThePower
 

Why didn't Warren win the Democratic nomination?


I would normally do this as a set of Twitter entries these days. But it’s a bit long, so …

As Elizabeth Warren — my primary choice — drops out of the field after a poor performance on Super Tuesday, the question that naturally arises is, why didn’t she win?




Everything seemed like it could have been there for her to do so. She had a remarkably high favorability score amongst Dem voters. She was usually at the top of the list as a second choice candidate. She was articulate, intelligent, passionate, showed her homework, and on and on.

Is there a magic, singular reason it didn’t happen? Nope. Instead, there are several reasons that coalesced to erode away her front-tier status — some of them her fault, some of them nobody’s fault, others …

It was a very crowded field. This was one of those years when everyone and their sibling decided to run in the Democratic field against Trump, heartened both by Trump’s own “anything’s possible” win in 2016 and his deep unpopularity. Remember those first few debates, where the contestants got mixed randomly across two nights?




The result was that a lot of folks liked Warren and even would have been okay with her, but were able to find someone closer to their preferences as their first choice. And among Warren’s own supporters, polls showed that they tended to be more excited about other candidates than other candidate’s supporters were, meaning other factors meant it was easier to peel off that support.

That said, to the extent that she, along with Sanders, were off to the further left side of the spectrum, she also suffered from direct ideological competition with Sanders, who came into the race with a large group of dedicated followers and the experience of 2016. If Sanders had not been in the race, a lot of that support would have presumably gone to her.




A lot has been made about sexism, given how we’ve gone from a large candidate tally that had multiple female candidates of varying credibility — Williamson, Gabbard, Harris, Gillibrand, Klobuchar, Warren — and have ended up with Two Old White Guys. (Gabbard remains in the race, but very much under the radar, and for reasons and goals that do not seem to be an actual run for the presidency.)

The sexism here is definitely a factor. Nobody credible said, “Oh, a woman can’t be President,” but plenty of people worried, “Hmmm, can a woman be elected President?” It wasn’t their own feelings that restrained them from supporting Warren, but their evaluation of other peoples’ feelings — the dreaded “electability” consideration. “Will Trump supporters who might be wavering consider voting for a woman?” “Will being a woman make her a particular target for Trump, like Clinton was?”




Even some folk who might overcome those questions in the abstract, when faced with the overwhelming urgency to defeat Trump, might have decided to play it safe and go for a guy.

Image/Photo

That similarly came into play in the question of Warren’s progressive politics — my sense is that she sold that policy more effectively for a lot of people than Sanders has, having more appeal to people closer to the center, but that whole “socialism” thing played into her electability factor as well. “I’d vote for her, but I’m not sure other people will” being the the self-fulfilling prophecy in the era of fearing Trump’s re-election.

Indeed, to the extent that the “socialism” thing has generated worry within the more centrist/moderate ranks of the Democratic party — where, even if they like individual proposals, it feels risky right now in a time of plague and with a Trump re-election at stake. Had Biden continued to falter, would Warren have been seen as a possible middle ground between Bloomberg and Sanders? The Biden resurgence at Super Tuesday, following his success in South Carolina, not only knocked out his immediate moderate competition, but ultimately Warren as well.




While Warren seemed to be less seen as an enemy of the Democratic establishment than Sanders, it’s also been clear that establishment — whether from fear of a Trump re-election or fear of their own wealth — were less enthused with the progressive left than the moderate / centrist wing of candidates. I don’t think they particularly put their thumb on the scales in her case, but I think they are just as glad to see her go.

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Warren got generally good marks for her debate performance, and everyone seems to agree that she gets the lion’s share of the credit for knocking Mike Bloomberg out of the race. But I found her outings at the debate a mixed bag, too reliant canned answers and repetitious anecdotes (she fared much better in 1:1 interviews and other less game show-style verbal outings). While her Vegas debate got her a small bump, I don’t think the debates helped her enough.

I’ve mentioned the problems of being, policy-wise, competing for the same ground against another major candidate whose turned out to be in the final contention. Subjectively, in the Twitter threads I followed, I found that there was a particularly vocal cadre of Sanders supporters who were aggressively resentful of her running as a progressive, “stealing” votes from Bernie, not being as ideologically pure as Bernie, and (worst of all) her occasionally criticizing or disagreeing with Bernie.




I don’t actually think a host of snake emoji and hashtags and vitriol scared her off, but it made any positive discussion of Warren and her campaign more difficult.

One of Warren’s tag lines was her “I have a plan for that.” I think that, net-net, that was a positive for her: she’d thought about these things, came up with concrete ways to address them that didn’t rely on magical thinking, and pursued them with confidence.

Image/Photo

The problem with so many plans was two-fold. For some folk it came across as too intellectual and wonkish. Like the Emperor’s “too many notes” critique in Amadeus, for some people her intellectual rigor and professorial background was a turn-off (which, coupled with societal sexism, probably didn’t help, either).

The other problem is that, when she felt she needed to revise something — from a misunderstanding, or because she saw a way to improve it, or even for political practicalities — it left her open to attack. This came up in particular over her shifting on Medicare For All; her shift (however you characterize it) on implementation timing didn’t improve her appeal to moderates who think M4A is either an awful idea or an election killer, and it was throwing chum into the tank for the Sander supporters who wanted to characterize her as No True Progressive And, In Fact, Probably Just Plain Evil Hssssssss (that Sanders politely disagreed with her and has spoken positively about her M4A support didn’t do anything about that kind of attack).




The question of age has come up in this election. While Warren always showed remarkable vigor, physically and mentally, she was sometimes lumped in with the other older candidates by some folk, and, to get back to the sexism thread, age is always more of a handicap for women in the public limelight than for men.

While some media outlets and individuals seemed warm to Warren, the nature of contemporary news coverage of elections netted out against her. She got face time when she was rising, but once that had stalled and she was further back in the pack — 3rd to 5th — she became yesterday’s news, to the extent that she was sometimes left out of polls or reporting on them, even in favor candidates that were doing worse but were the media flavor of the week (as Klobuchar and Buttigieg took turns with late in the campaign).

The media loves a horse race, competitive drama. When Warren wasn’t providing that, the media coverage dried up, whether or not it shouldn’t have. Super Tuesday was a poor showing for her, but the coverage of that night made it out to be a two-person race regardless of what primaries were still to come or the nature of the convention. That didn’t help.

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The last element in the room, so to speak, was the whole Native American heritage kerfuffle. [1]Warren’s initial error in letting family stories about that heritage convince her to identify for a time as Native American (though not with any actual harm done or advantage gained, from all that it has been investigated), and then her attempt to confirm that family story through DNA testing would always have been a blot of misjudgment on her record. But its gleefully racist misuse by Trump made it be seen as a liability in the election, and there were enough folk who felt, despite Warren’s repeated explanations and apologies, that it a serious problem that it gave more ammo to her critics within the party (again, generally from the Sanders camp) as if she had been gleefully stealing money from Native American babies while wearing a Washington Redskins jersey, hisssssssss.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1235598653114511360

What should have been — in the face of a thousand racist (etc.) transgressions by Trump, or of Biden lying about his background in the civil rights movement, or even some of the baggage Sanders is carrying around — a road bump became, not the iceberg that sunk Warren, but a wound that never was allowed to heal.

No list of “Why did this happen in the election” is complete without mention of possible foreign interference (thanks, Trump, for letting that particular concern about our democracy metastasize). Nobody’s suggested that Warren was a target for opposition (or support) by, say, Russia. But I can’t see her as a potential president that Russia would consider in their interests, like Trump, nor is she as divisive as her ideological niche competitor, Sanders. If nobody actively targeted Warren, the general partisan and intra-partisan conflict that Russia has fomented certainly worked against her.

None of these were conclusive. None of these factors explain everything. Individually Warren could have survived any of them. Cumulatively, though, they drove her campaign to the point of non-viability to win outright, or even to have a substantial delegate role in the convention. [2]Her decision to suspend her campaign is, sadly, probably the best one.

But I’ll always regret she didn’t get the nomination and become the next President of the United States. [3]Thanks, Senator Warren!

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[1]I am not Native American, so I acknowledge my perspective here has limitations. It did seem that I saw a lot more criticism of Warren on this from non-NAs than from NAs and tribal representatives, esp. after she apologized early days in the campaign.

[2]Note that there is a timeline out there where we end up with a contested election and Warren gets drafted as the compromise candidate between Biden and Sanders– this kind of possibility is one reason why candidates always suspend their campaigns, not end them (though campaign finance is a much bigger reason). I deem this scenario highly unlikely, but it is not outside the bounds of historic possibility. Just saying.

[3]It has been suggested that either Biden or Sanders might offer her the VP role. I don’t think she would take it; more importantly, she is of more value in the Senate, both for her ongoing contributions and because, if she was elected as VP, the GOP governor of Massachusetts would name her, presumably GOP, successor, and Senate balance is nearly as critical as the White House.

That said … Senate Majority Leader Elizabeth Warren has a nice ring to it.

\#nb #3sd-seriousstuff #election2020 #warren
Originally posted at: https://hill-kleerup.org/blog/2020/03/05/why-didnt-warren-win-the-democratic-nomination.html
 

Why didn't Warren win the Democratic nomination?


I would normally do this as a set of Twitter entries these days. But it’s a bit long, so …

As Elizabeth Warren — my primary choice — drops out of the field after a poor performance on Super Tuesday, the question that naturally arises is, why didn’t she win?




Everything seemed like it could have been there for her to do so. She had a remarkably high favorability score amongst Dem voters. She was usually at the top of the list as a second choice candidate. She was articulate, intelligent, passionate, showed her homework, and on and on.

Is there a magic, singular reason it didn’t happen? Nope. Instead, there are several reasons that coalesced to erode away her front-tier status — some of them her fault, some of them nobody’s fault, others …

It was a very crowded field. This was one of those years when everyone and their sibling decided to run in the Democratic field against Trump, heartened both by Trump’s own “anything’s possible” win in 2016 and his deep unpopularity. Remember those first few debates, where the contestants got mixed randomly across two nights?




The result was that a lot of folks liked Warren and even would have been okay with her, but were able to find someone closer to their preferences as their first choice. And among Warren’s own supporters, polls showed that they tended to be more excited about other candidates than other candidate’s supporters were, meaning other factors meant it was easier to peel off that support.

That said, to the extent that she, along with Sanders, were off to the further left side of the spectrum, she also suffered from direct ideological competition with Sanders, who came into the race with a large group of dedicated followers and the experience of 2016. If Sanders had not been in the race, a lot of that support would have presumably gone to her.




A lot has been made about sexism, given how we’ve gone from a large candidate tally that had multiple female candidates of varying credibility — Williamson, Gabbard, Harris, Gillibrand, Klobuchar, Warren — and have ended up with Two Old White Guys. (Gabbard remains in the race, but very much under the radar, and for reasons and goals that do not seem to be an actual run for the presidency.)

The sexism here is definitely a factor. Nobody credible said, “Oh, a woman can’t be President,” but plenty of people worried, “Hmmm, can a woman be elected President?” It wasn’t their own feelings that restrained them from supporting Warren, but their evaluation of other peoples’ feelings — the dreaded “electability” consideration. “Will Trump supporters who might be wavering consider voting for a woman?” “Will being a woman make her a particular target for Trump, like Clinton was?”




Even some folk who might overcome those questions in the abstract, when faced with the overwhelming urgency to defeat Trump, might have decided to play it safe and go for a guy.

Image/Photo

That similarly came into play in the question of Warren’s progressive politics — my sense is that she sold that policy more effectively for a lot of people than Sanders has, having more appeal to people closer to the center, but that whole “socialism” thing played into her electability factor as well. “I’d vote for her, but I’m not sure other people will” being the the self-fulfilling prophecy in the era of fearing Trump’s re-election.

Indeed, to the extent that the “socialism” thing has generated worry within the more centrist/moderate ranks of the Democratic party — where, even if they like individual proposals, it feels risky right now in a time of plague and with a Trump re-election at stake. Had Biden continued to falter, would Warren have been seen as a possible middle ground between Bloomberg and Sanders? The Biden resurgence at Super Tuesday, following his success in South Carolina, not only knocked out his immediate moderate competition, but ultimately Warren as well.




While Warren seemed to be less seen as an enemy of the Democratic establishment than Sanders, it’s also been clear that establishment — whether from fear of a Trump re-election or fear of their own wealth — were less enthused with the progressive left than the moderate / centrist wing of candidates. I don’t think they particularly put their thumb on the scales in her case, but I think they are just as glad to see her go.

Image/Photo

Warren got generally good marks for her debate performance, and everyone seems to agree that she gets the lion’s share of the credit for knocking Mike Bloomberg out of the race. But I found her outings at the debate a mixed bag, too reliant canned answers and repetitious anecdotes (she fared much better in 1:1 interviews and other less game show-style verbal outings). While her Vegas debate got her a small bump, I don’t think the debates helped her enough.

I’ve mentioned the problems of being, policy-wise, competing for the same ground against another major candidate whose turned out to be in the final contention. Subjectively, in the Twitter threads I followed, I found that there was a particularly vocal cadre of Sanders supporters who were aggressively resentful of her running as a progressive, “stealing” votes from Bernie, not being as ideologically pure as Bernie, and (worst of all) her occasionally criticizing or disagreeing with Bernie.




I don’t actually think a host of snake emoji and hashtags and vitriol scared her off, but it made any positive discussion of Warren and her campaign more difficult.

One of Warren’s tag lines was her “I have a plan for that.” I think that, net-net, that was a positive for her: she’d thought about these things, came up with concrete ways to address them that didn’t rely on magical thinking, and pursued them with confidence.

Image/Photo

The problem with so many plans was two-fold. For some folk it came across as too intellectual and wonkish. Like the Emperor’s “too many notes” critique in Amadeus, for some people her intellectual rigor and professorial background was a turn-off (which, coupled with societal sexism, probably didn’t help, either).

The other problem is that, when she felt she needed to revise something — from a misunderstanding, or because she saw a way to improve it, or even for political practicalities — it left her open to attack. This came up in particular over her shifting on Medicare For All; her shift (however you characterize it) on implementation timing didn’t improve her appeal to moderates who think M4A is either an awful idea or an election killer, and it was throwing chum into the tank for the Sander supporters who wanted to characterize her as No True Progressive And, In Fact, Probably Just Plain Evil Hssssssss (that Sanders politely disagreed with her and has spoken positively about her M4A support didn’t do anything about that kind of attack).




The question of age has come up in this election. While Warren always showed remarkable vigor, physically and mentally, she was sometimes lumped in with the other older candidates by some folk, and, to get back to the sexism thread, age is always more of a handicap for women in the public limelight than for men.

While some media outlets and individuals seemed warm to Warren, the nature of contemporary news coverage of elections netted out against her. She got face time when she was rising, but once that had stalled and she was further back in the pack — 3rd to 5th — she became yesterday’s news, to the extent that she was sometimes left out of polls or reporting on them, even in favor candidates that were doing worse but were the media flavor of the week (as Klobuchar and Buttigieg took turns with late in the campaign).

The media loves a horse race, competitive drama. When Warren wasn’t providing that, the media coverage dried up, whether or not it shouldn’t have. Super Tuesday was a poor showing for her, but the coverage of that night made it out to be a two-person race regardless of what primaries were still to come or the nature of the convention. That didn’t help.

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The last element in the room, so to speak, was the whole Native American heritage kerfuffle. [1]Warren’s initial error in letting family stories about that heritage convince her to identify for a time as Native American (though not with any actual harm done or advantage gained, from all that it has been investigated), and then her attempt to confirm that family story through DNA testing would always have been a blot of misjudgment on her record. But its gleefully racist misuse by Trump made it be seen as a liability in the election, and there were enough folk who felt, despite Warren’s repeated explanations and apologies, that it a serious problem that it gave more ammo to her critics within the party (again, generally from the Sanders camp) as if she had been gleefully stealing money from Native American babies while wearing a Washington Redskins jersey, hisssssssss.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1235598653114511360

What should have been — in the face of a thousand racist (etc.) transgressions by Trump, or of Biden lying about his background in the civil rights movement, or even some of the baggage Sanders is carrying around — a road bump became, not the iceberg that sunk Warren, but a wound that never was allowed to heal.

No list of “Why did this happen in the election” is complete without mention of possible foreign interference (thanks, Trump, for letting that particular concern about our democracy metastasize). Nobody’s suggested that Warren was a target for opposition (or support) by, say, Russia. But I can’t see her as a potential president that Russia would consider in their interests, like Trump, nor is she as divisive as her ideological niche competitor, Sanders. If nobody actively targeted Warren, the general partisan and intra-partisan conflict that Russia has fomented certainly worked against her.

None of these were conclusive. None of these factors explain everything. Individually Warren could have survived any of them. Cumulatively, though, they drove her campaign to the point of non-viability to win outright, or even to have a substantial delegate role in the convention. [2]Her decision to suspend her campaign is, sadly, probably the best one.

But I’ll always regret she didn’t get the nomination and become the next President of the United States. [3]Thanks, Senator Warren!

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[1]I am not Native American, so I acknowledge my perspective here has limitations. It did seem that I saw a lot more criticism of Warren on this from non-NAs than from NAs and tribal representatives, esp. after she apologized early days in the campaign.

[2]Note that there is a timeline out there where we end up with a contested election and Warren gets drafted as the compromise candidate between Biden and Sanders– this kind of possibility is one reason why candidates always suspend their campaigns, not end them (though campaign finance is a much bigger reason). I deem this scenario highly unlikely, but it is not outside the bounds of historic possibility. Just saying.

[3]It has been suggested that either Biden or Sanders might offer her the VP role. I don’t think she would take it; more importantly, she is of more value in the Senate, both for her ongoing contributions and because, if she was elected as VP, the GOP governor of Massachusetts would name her, presumably GOP, successor, and Senate balance is nearly as critical as the White House.

That said … Senate Majority Leader Elizabeth Warren has a nice ring to it.

\#nb #3sd-seriousstuff #election2020 #warren
Originally posted at: https://hill-kleerup.org/blog/2020/03/05/why-didnt-warren-win-the-democratic-nomination.html
 
Quote of note:

"This is a country fearful of any kind of change at all, a country longing for a simpler time—which, these days, does not mean the flush 1950s or the pastoral 1850s, but 2015. The election of Donald Trump has lodged in so many minds a longing for the status quo ante that there’s no room for intelligent experimentation."

Via Elizabeth Warren Was More of a Threat to the Money Power Than Bernie Sanders

#election2020
 
Quote of note:

"The coronavirus doesn’t care how wealthy you are or what political party you are in. The best way to be sure the person next to you isn’t sick is to make health care available to everyone. The best way to achieve that is through 'Medicare for All'."

"As the coronavirus pandemic spreads, it is in every individual’s interest to know that all people have access to preventive and diagnostic care, as well as treatment if needed. You don’t want to come down with COVID-19 because a person you were next to in some public setting couldn’t afford a deductible or co-pay, didn’t have paid sick leave or is among the 37 million in the U.S. who completely lack health insurance."

Via It's Medicare or Coronavirus-for-All

#MedicareForAll #Bernie2020 #election2020 #healthcare
It’s Medicare or Coronavirus-for-All
 
Bernie Sanders' Medicare for All Policy Would Likely Increase Wages and Create Jobs, New Economic Analysis Shows

"A new analysis of the economic impact of a Medicare for All health care reform, like the signature policy proposal of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, suggests that such a plan would not only increase wages for workers but also create additional jobs."

"Sanders, a progressive senator from Vermont who is currently a close second to former Vice President Joe Biden, the Democratic frontrunner, has long advocated for a universal or single-payer health care system. Critics argue that such a policy would lead to mass job loss and be an economic drain on the country, but the new analysis published Thursday by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) suggests the opposite would happen."

"Josh Bivens, EPI's director who conducted the study, wrote in the report that Medicare for All 'would be unambiguously positive' for the labor market in the U.S., leading to a 'boost in wages and salaries' as well as an 'increase in job quality, while producing 'a net increase in jobs'."

"Although the analysis notes that policymakers should not ignore the distress caused by job transitions' due to such a health care reform, Bivens wrote that job losses during a transitional period would be 'relatively small'."

#Bernie2020 #MedicareForAll #election2020 #healthcare
 
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Quote of note:

"One of the hardest parts of this is... all those little girls who are going to have to wait four more years. That's gonna be hard."

Via https://twitter.com/atrupar/status/1235622308401876994

#election2020
 
Patriarchy is a hell of a drug

#DNC #election2020
Patriarchy is a hell of a drug
 
Quote of note:

"Biden isn’t just a literal return to a Democratic status quo; he is, at this point in his life, its oldest and least competent version."

Via The Most Diverse Field in History Has Come Down to This

#election2020 #DNC
 
THIS also explains a few reasons why I also left the Democratic Party, and have been an Independent for decades now, but forced to vote as a Democrat in a critically flawed two-party system And while this op-ed specifically mentions Elizabeth Warren being 'politically disappeared', I understand all too well, which is why I support Bernie Sanders.

Quote of note:

"...I watch as Elizabeth Warren is politically 'disappeared', and no one in the party stands up for her right to be seen and heard on an even par with the men in the race. Whether or not she is your candidate, she has a right to a level competitive field, but ever since she put Michael Bloomberg in his place and began to move up in the polls, she has been silenced. NBC’s March 3 Today Show did a segment on the lack of ethnic and gender diversity at this stage of the race and didn’t mention Warren’s name once until the very end, and then only in relation to what Bloomberg, getting lower polling numbers than her, was doing. Where is the voice of the party on this? Where are the voices of all the male 'woke' candidates? Every professional woman I know has had the experience of being the ignored, and often right, voice in the room. Why aren’t women of the party insisting Warren at least be treated equally by the media? Happy Women’s History Month."

Via Why I left the Democrats

Worth a read. It's short and sweet.

#Bernie2020 #election2020 #FightThePower #Corporatocracy
 
Quote of note:

"If Biden walks into the convention, or at the end of the process, has more votes than me, he’s the winner." -- Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), in an interview on MSNBC

Via Sanders agrees: the person with the most delegates at the convention wins

This appears to be a move by Bernie as an effort to avoid a contested convention for the Democratic Party nominee. Now it is more important than ever for Bernie to win the most delegates before then. If Biden agrees, I think everyone would happily line up behind Mr. Biden if he wins the majority of delegates before the convention. If some super-delegate monkey business happens at the convention which alienates the Sanders progressive base, it could spell disaster for the Democrats, and leadto 4 more years of the Orange Menace. Not sure how this will actually be received by ~~the establishment~~ ~~the DNC~~ the Biden campaign.

#Bernie2020 #election2020
 
Trump is losing what little is left of his mind.

#Trump #corruption #election2020
 
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