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30. If you were in charge of the ttrpg industry, what would you change?

Being in charge of the ttrpg industry would imply that there really was such a thing as "the ttrpg industry", which would mean a bunch of healthy companies producing cool stuff, rather than one small niche company, a handful of vastly smaller niche companies, and a bunch of small press hobbyists.

In such a fantasy land, I would use my questionable authority to do the following:

  • Everybody uses open licensing.
  • Large companies (there are many in this fantasy land) fund artists to create open licensed art (somewhat like the Eclipse Phase hack packs).
  • Holders of out-of-print or "dead" IP release open licensed versions, even in just text.
  • Companies consider part of their business (even maybe the primary part) as harnessing the creativity of their customers, allowing them to build and share cool stuff they build on top of the companies' product line.
  • More software support for tabletop games, also open source.
  • All of this is magically profitable.
 
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29. Exciting 2019 RPG Trends?


  • The number and diversity of people motivated to bring the games they want to play into the world seems to be increasing, as does the market for such games.
  • The tenor of games Powered by the Apocalypse is changing, pulling the basic core concept in more interesting directions, for very specific purposes.
  • Some of the idiotic "us vs. them" divisions are eroding, along with the insipid personality-cult bullshit that spawned them.
  • The culture of play (that is, actually trying out a bunch of new games and seeing what happens, rather than just theorizing and navel-gazing) is getting stronger.
  • The rise of people watching recordings of actual play (which, I admit, I don't understand) is bringing different voices into the hobby.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 30

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30. If you were in charge of the ttrpg industry, what would you change?
I'm not sure I'm arrogant enough to answer this question with any degree of authority. I mean, the industry isn't a homogeneous organization, or even a consortium; it's a sort of collective silo of companies ranging from WoTC and Paizo down to one person putting out their indie game in PDF because they can't afford a print run. Trying to provide any sort of sweeping generalization just seems to be overreaching. I might suggest an advertising fund, contributed to on an as-able basis, that promotes ttrpgs outside of the existing target groups. We could all use more players, a larger market to divide up amongst us, and if we all chipped in according to our ability, ttrpgs in general might profit from letting people know what's out there. This could be done on a smaller basis, like a consortium of smaller publishers working to let people know there's more to ttrpgs than D&D. I dunno, just spitballing. I'll be over here in my corner, staying in my lane, and not pretending like I have any grand solutions to the problems facing us all.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 29

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29. Exciting 2019 RPG Trends?
The market and industry have grown wide and deep enough in terms of available and forthcoming product that I'm unable to track it. I've been head-down over my own product lines, trying to get product out and stay in my lane. Once in a while I come up for air and see some cool stuff, but scattered data points do not make a trendline. I'm not the right person for this question.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 28

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28. What tools help you create?
Deadlines. Nothing like Time tapping its foot impatiently to get one typing.
Oh, you meant software? LibreOffice, ProjectLibre, NixNote.
Physical stuff? A Mead notebook, one of those small fat ones that fits in a jacket pocket and has enough room in the wire spiral to use it as a pen holder. I used to use reporter's notebooks, and still have a couple of blank ones in my desk drawer, but the Mead form factor works better for me. My laptop is a ThinkPad T410i running MX Linux. I dream one day of being able to get a docking station, an external keyboard, and two monitors, but right now I'm having trouble paying the mortgage. Unemployment sucks.
Bills. Those are a great motivator.
 
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28. What tools help you create?

  • TextMate
  • Illustrator
  • InDesign
  • Python
  • Cheetah3D
  • Eclipse
  • FOP
  • Photoshop
  • Excel
  • Git
  • The Creative Commons Licenses
 
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27. How do you market your work?

Whenever I release something, I post to my blog about it. I try to find some online space relevant to the the contents and post about it there. For example, when releasing Fourth World I found some #Earthdawn and #DungeonWorld groups and forums and posted about it there. I don’t track metrics of how effective (or not) this is.

Mostly, I don’t really market. I, probably naively, assume that anyone who really cares about what I make is subscribed to the RSS feed of my low traffic blog.

(Worth mentioning: on Friendica, if you paste the URL of an RSS feed into the “Add New Contact” box, it will add that feed much like a user. This can be overwhelming for blogs that post a lot, but is very helpful for low-traffic feeds you might not check often.)
 

April TTRPG Maker post 27

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27. How do you market your work?
Mostly by social media and appearances at conventions. As with the old days at FASA, our Marketing budget is the last thing that gets funded, and often by the time the plate gets passed that far down the table, someone's eaten the plate. Earthdawn and Demonworld have well-established reputations and followings, so the fandom generally comes to us. We host our own Discord server, we have a website, we have the usual stuff (FB page, Twitter account). I do a lot of stuff on the Fediverse and MeWe, and am a frequent panelist on Tenkar's Tavern's podcast talk shows. These days, half of what you're marketing isn't your product, it's yourself. You have to build personal engagement and be a part of the gaming community, and then slip in mentions of your product line where you can.
 
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26. Favorite online community?

The shared geography of real-life communities creates certain dynamics that can’t exist in an online space. So, there really isn’t any online space that is actually a “community”. But even accepting a wider definition, many spaces that claim to be “online communities” aren’t. G+, for example, while easily my favorite social space by far, wasn’t at all a “community”. My current favorite social space, the rpgtable.top Friendica instance, isn’t a “community”. Dumpshock was a community (probably still is, I don’t hang there anymore), as was patternspider.net. The unofficial Exalted wiki was a community that transformed into another community, then disintegrated. I liked all of those. It’s pretty clear that the Gauntlet is really a community at this point, but I’m just an outsider looking in on them, since I don’t like playing games online.

So, I dunno. If I can even be said to have a favorite online community, it doesn’t exist any more.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 26

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26. Favorite online community?
It would be disingenuous to say it's the one where I'm posting this (https://rpgtable.top), as I'm one of the admins, and we're still building the Friendica instance in terms of participation, so I'll just link-drop instead. I spend much of my time on Discord, on Tenkar's Tavern (where I'm just another game designer among dozens) and on the FASA Official Discord (where I'm the instance owner), and on Mastodon (where I'm just some random person on tabletop.social). Discord tends to be the most active and thus the most engaging for me. I used to be very active on G+ but we all know how that went. I maintain a presence on FB for advertising, which is about all it's good for anyway.
 
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25. A rad diversity consultant?

Open to suggestions.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 25

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25. A rad diversity consultant?
James Mendez Hodes, @James Mendez Hodes. Seriously, if you haven't read his work on why diversity consultants exist and are needed, go look this guy up. Right now. His work says way more about this topic than I ever could.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 24

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24. Favorite RPG thing to create?
A fertile seed. Something another gamer picks up and runs with. A cool idea for a scenario, a clever puzzle, an odd magic item. A thing that someone sees and says, hey, this could be fun, let's use it. Gaming to me is like stage acting - the script is just the guidelines, the work needs to be presented to really exist.
 
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24. Favorite RPG thing to create?

If you’ve ever seen my explanation of DivNull seeds, it won’t surprise you that the Thing Being Created is of secondary importance to what I’m trying to learn by making it. So, I guess my favorite thing to create is knowledge, training and practice.
 
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22. How are you working to improve the ttrpg community?

I back a ton of Kickstarters and Patreons and such. I back charities like the RPG Creators Relief Fund. I try to evangelize games I like.

Some years back, I stopped buying or supporting game products with male-gazy covers/art. I haven’t missed them. I don’t by games written by pricks. I haven’t missed them, either.

I’d like to support my local gaming stores more, but this has become more and more difficult. I almost never buy hard-copy products anymore. It doesn’t help that one of the larger stores near me has turned into something of a testosterone den. There was a really great store around, but it was nearly an hour away from me, and has since gone out of business.

I try to starve assholes of the attention they seek. When someone puts themselves at risk by accusing someone else of something unsavory, I tend to believe them.

Frankly, one thing I do to help “the community” is realize that “the community” doesn’t really exist.

I also realize that most of the above is a minimal condition. It’s not like I’m out there taking huge risks.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 21

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21. What external factors do you struggle with to create?
Money, or the lack of it. Right now, I'm unemployed, have been since 8 March after the company that brought me up to NYC with such great promises dumped me like yesterday's garbage when the client went broke and closed out the contract. Dealing with impending foreclosure and similar large issues (no, I don't have any savings or stocks or whatever white people my age are supposed to have, I'm broke like everybody else) has severely cramped my ability to create. I haven't been able to GM a game session since I got the news at the end of February. I'm on lithium just to be able to cope. But you didn't come here to hear me whinge about my personal problems. There will be gaming material produced. The show must go on. After all, the tickets have already been sold, and nobody gives refunds.
 
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21. What external factors do you struggle with to create?

I’m assuming this is asking “what external factors make creating difficult”, not “what difficulties do you have creating external factors”.

I’m extremely fortunate that the only factors that get the way of making stuff are finding enough time. Demands of family and work supersede game-making.

I think it is pretty amazing that many of the technical barriers to making a game and getting it out into the world have vanished. Some costs (internet, hardware, software) remain, but are falling.

The horrifying part is that the biggest external factors for a lot of people are social, generally involving some parts of humanity making totally avoidable choices to be shitbags to other parts of humanity.
 
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20. A game you want to make that you think no one would play.

Well, I made ’inkadia with the full knowledge that no one would ever play it, not even me.
 
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19. Favorite themes to explore?

Not a theme so much as something that usually leads to a theme: taking as given something in a game system or world, and pushing the idea to get to some other starting point. An example may explain it better. Let's go with the D&D 3.5 wall of iron trick.

I went on about this nearly a decade ago, but you might not be able to read it. Has to do with an alleged "infinite money" scheme, whereby 50gp of magical components are turned into several hundred pounds of iron which, by the book, can be sold for 25gp per pound. Repeat until rich. Naturally, it wouldn't go down like that. But if you follow the reasoning of what would happen all the way down, you pretty quickly reach this conclusion: any society where cheap, permanent conjuring exists functions as a post-scarcity society.

And that leads you to a whole different game (since 3.5 is decidedly not a post-scarcity game). I'm not really into 3.5 any more, but post-scarcity fantasy worlds? Now that is worth exploring.

A game that's gestating in my head right now has a different starting point, but is still based around pushing some concept. In this case: when a world suddenly gains access to cheap, universal reincarnation (e.g. the goofy AD&D version, where you come back as a bugbear or something), what does society look like, say 500 years later?

That sort of "take this absurd thing as true and run as far as you can" is fun to explore, at least to me. Not exactly a "theme", though.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 18

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18. What are some underlying messages in your work?
Actions have consequences. What you do will affect your character and the game world, in ways you did not expect and may not want. The playing field is not level, never has been, and probably never will be, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't fight like hell to make it so. The right person in the right place at the right time can make a difference, choose wisely. A small course correction now will make a big difference down the line. Violence is the easy answer, but rarely the right one; the right answer will often be the hard one. Good people make hard choices and see them through, sometimes at great personal cost but for the benefit of the larger community. Question authority. Challenge the established order. Is there a better way to do things? All people have the right to be themselves and be let alone about it. Don't worry about how you will be remembered - worry about who will be around to remember.
 
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16. How does your environment inform your work?

The answer I want to give this question only works by providing examples that I’m not allowed to mention due to agreements I have made. But, maybe that’s as good of an answer to today’s question as any.
 
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15. Favorite tropes to subvert?

Art is orthogonal to commerce.

Killing and looting is heroic.

Reality matters more than perception.

Worlds where magic is real resemble some particular time/place on Earth.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 15

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15. Favorite tropes to subvert?
Top of the list, stereotypical personalities by Profession / Discipline / character class. Earthdawn has a Discipline called the Nethermancer, a magician who works with True Patterns, astral space, spirits, and explores the boundaries between life and death and other states of existence. Traditionally, they're creepy. If you're going up against a Horror, the big nasties of the game, you want one with you, but even then, they're uncomfortable to have around. Always the question of whether their studies of the Elder Gods have driven them mad. In my ongoing Earthdawn campaign, I have a Nethermancer NPC, Rayechka, a dwarf woman of sunny disposition who dresses like a hippie, patchwork peasant skirt, muslin blouse, ankle and wrist bracelets, a flower in her hair and maybe one painted on her face. She firmly believes that it's better to negotiate with the spirits than to command them. She bakes bread to let off stress, lives in a tiny, charming cottage behind a saddlery, and wields considerable power when she needs to. Others include the dour Troubadour who specializes in murder ballads, the tribal ork cavalryman who's well-read and quite civil off the battlefield, and so on.
 
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14. How are your game mechanics and characters intersectional?

Ah. That kind of "intersectional". I have to replace my earlier, better, response to what I originally thought this question was asking.

Given my response on Day 3, you might suspect that being intersectional really isn't a design goal of mine. Sadly, you'd be right. That said, it's not something I avoid either. I tend to write assuming that the reader isn't a white dude and won't necessarily be playing a white dude. My examples feature characters of all stripes. If I ever actually commissioned or used art, it wouldn't have white dudes in it. You know, the easy stuff. Content-wise, I don't feel qualified to tightly focus on intersectionality, so tend to just leave a void, where someone who is could make it work for them in play.

As for game mechanics, apart from maybe safety tools, it's hard to see how they could be intersectional without exhibiting the problem they aim to solve. Maybe something that somehow guaranteed each voice at the table equal time and equal weight?
 
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13. Participate in streamed games?

No.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 13

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13. Participate in streamed games?
I haven't done anything streamed yet, or on a VTT. I've been running games on audio chat clients for a number of years, though. We started with Skype, but then Microsoft bought it and removed a couple of features we'd been using, and the call quality suffered. We moved to Google Hangouts for a while, but then that started having call quality issues, especially for users with low bandwidth. We migrated to Discord a year or two back, and have been very happy with it. I now run all my regular games on private channels on the FASA Discord server. If you're running Earthdawn or 1879, and would like a private channel of your own, let me know.
 
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12. How to make work inclusive?

Not a direct answer to this question, but adjacent. And more interesting than what I thought I’d be writing today: From Brittney Cooper being interviewed on The TED Radio Hour, in response to the question “why do you think it’s so difficult for white Americans to talk about the past in frank and empathetic way?”:

“…white Americans see themselves as people who work really hard, and they believe in the myth of meritocracy. We’re all indoctrinated into this myth. It’s the American myth, right? You come to this country, you work hard and anything is possible for you. And so, anyone who doesn’t have the things that they say they want, they don’t have them because they ‘didn’t work hard’. And so then, when you have to listen to people of color point out all the ways in which that isn’t true, it disrupts a fundamental identity narrative for many white American folk about how they came to their prosperity.”

She continues with good advice, but for this particular question, the gist of the above is to suggest: question your own notions about what “merit” is and means.
 
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9. How do your games distribute power among players?

Not very well. This is an area I need to think harder about. I tend to favor games with a game master role, even though a) I’m not that great of a GM and b) most of the original games I’ve made have been GM-less.

In writing a chapter in Fourth World, I did come across a useful phrase, though: Plurium Interrogationum. This is the idea of asking a question containing assumptions that have to be conceded as true to even answer it, known by a number of other monikers (e.g. “establishing questions”, etc.). It makes for a good in-game method of spreading around narrative authority in a GM’d game.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 9

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9. How do your games distribute power among players?
To start off, 1879 distributes power between GM and players by defining the need for player agency as greater than the need for GM control. It's the players' story, and while the GM may lay the foundations, it's the players that will build the house. The sections on How To Play for both players and GMs stress the cooperative nature of the game, that opposition provided by the GM is necessary for dramatic conflict but is not competition for the spotlight. Beyond that, the character types are designed so that they don't overlap much, and the examples of play and published adventures are designed so that they require a wide variety of Skills and abilities. This helps ensure that each player will get their turn in the spotlight. Each character type also has social advantages and disadvantages, which are represented mechanically, so that the game reinforces the moving spotlight. Nobody will be good in all situations; agency must be shared for the player team to succeed.
 
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7. How to increase accessibility?

I never really thought about accessibility until I saw Jacob Wood's Accessible Guide to RPG Layout. I still don't think about it as much as I probably should, but since that was one of my firsts texts after I started laying out my own games, I keep a lot of it in mind- especially in regards to font choice and colors.
 
QFT
 

April TTRPG Maker post 8

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8. Favorite collaborators?
The people I regularly game with. There's no substitute for playtesting. The sandbox campaign of 1879 I'm running has generated more ideas and more usable material for the Grosvenor World sourcebook than the writers who have been working on it.
 
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7. How to increase accessibility?

I never really thought about accessibility until I saw Jacob Wood's Accessible Guide to RPG Layout. I still don't think about it as much as I probably should, but since that was one of my firsts texts after I started laying out my own games, I keep a lot of it in mind- especially in regards to font choice and colors.
 
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6. Long or short ttrpg texts?

I'm more likely to complete short. So I try for that, but then find I don't have enough room to encapsulate all of my ideas. So it gets longer. I'm trying to learn to be concise and be able to kill ideas that take me away from that using #Itch #GameJams, #200WordRPG, #GameChef and other events to help me fit an idea in varying word counts. I've had some success, but have a way to go.
 
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8. Favorite collaborators?

The broader role-playing hive mind that formed on G+.

Oh, well.
 
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7. How to increase accessibility?

For whatever definition of “accessibility” this question intends to be using, my answer is mostly the same: no frigging idea.

I give my games away for free on the Internet, under a license that lets you do nearly anything you want with them. So, from that standpoint, the only access limitation is access to computers and the Internet. So, to increase accessibility, I guess that would bring us to helping people connect to the net.

For the more user-interface notions of “accessibility”, I could do better. I’ve been looking at generating epub versions of my stuff lately, readers for which do better with, say, text-to-speech than PDF readers, usually.
 
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6. Long or short ttrpg texts?

I try for short. I never succeed.

For one thing, I have that “completist” thing and it is hard to kill, both in making stuff and collecting stuff. There’s always a “but wait, this might happen, so I should add that”. I’m getting better at ignoring that voice, but it’s always there.

There is also a notion out there that “creative constraints” help focus you to build something you might not have thought of otherwise. Might work for some people, but its never produced anything great from me. Some examples:

  • Enslaved Star, my entry into a 200-word RPG contest has a pretty good premise, but I couldn’t really make the premise sing in play given the space constraint. There may still be a good game in there, but it won’t be 200 words.
  • My terrible game Valence was way too long to be a Little Game Chef entry, but it needed to be about three times longer still. I mistakenly submitted it anyway, even knowing that. One day, I’ll figure out how to make something fun using chemistry models as the mechanic.
  • The full-on Game Chef that same year pulled a better game out of me, but it could tell it needed to be way longer than a Game Chef entry should be. I still think there is something in Exodus, but the end result will be longer and playbook-y, not shorter.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 7

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7. How to increase accessibility?
This is a word that has a lot of meanings, and really requires an essay, not a post. FASA is not currently publishing a Braille version of any of our books, which is problematic both in that our work is not directly accessible to people with sight problems and who read Braille, and that such publication is expensive partly because of production costs and partly because of the limited market. There's also a question of desirability. Deaf culture has a tradition of storytelling, but not so much of roleplaying games. I'm losing my hearing, slowly but steadily, and have been investigating options for learning ASL and getting involved with the deaf community, as I'm going to join it sooner or later. As a GM, I'd like to keep running games when I can no longer hear, but am uncertain as to whether there's a desire in the community for such activity. Language itself can also be a barrier. Translating a game from French to English, or English to Portuguese, takes time and resources. Getting the translated book printed and distributed takes resources. Most gaming companies aren't big enough to have distribution networks and printers outside their home country. Partnerships are required, and that gets into international business law and all sorts of issues. Breaking down the barriers to me would involve availability of the game in multiple formats based on the capabilities of the potential players, and finding ways to produce and distribute translations that are less costly but still provide some form of income to the artists and writers who created the original work.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 6

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6. Long or short ttrpg texts?
That varies according to the game, the world, and the context. At a convention, or other demo, I want a short text that gets right to the point - what is cool about this game and world that makes it different from all others? Give me your elevator pitch. At home, I want a massive freakin' tome. I want Tekumel. Build your world in grand sweeping strokes, focus down on the minutiae of daily life, tell me a story of epic grandeur in a world that feels properly lived in. My current lust-game, the one I've been buying with the vain hope of ever playing it just because it's so attractive visually, textually, conceptually, is Shadows of Esteren. The core rulebook is nearly the size of 1st Edition Earthdawn, double the page count of Hillfolk, and I've devoured it slowly, savoring the richness of the world and the lushness of the content. Turning this around, I try to do the same with my own system - at conventions, provide one page, one sided, at most of background, an elevator pitch for the game world focusing on the divergence of history, the steampunk technology, the return of magic, the stable wormhole in Greenwich Park to another world, and get into character selection and game play within ten minutes at most, five if I can manage it. The game books, on the other hand, are chunky. The Players Guide goes into everything you need to play the game. The GM's Guide strolls leisurely through the game world and provides the level of detail needed for running an interesting campaign. The regional sourcebooks are richly seeded with details, plot hooks, odd NPCs, things you can hang a side quest or an entire adventure off of.
 
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5. Character or worldbuilding?

Image/Photo

I have reams full of characters. It's one of the first things that I try when I get a new system. It's one of the first areas of concentration in my designs. That said, the characters cannot stand alone and a world that is suited to the characters, and the characters are suited to, is key in bringing any narrative alive. So as I create the characters, they breathe life into my concepts for the worlds.

I tend to build characters more than worlds, but the worlds I spend more time upon. All that said, I really can't choose between the two.
 
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5. Character or worldbuilding?

Tough question. I think harder about world building, I suppose. And, I’ve written at least one specifically world-building game, where you create a world by destroying a painting. The weird thing is that I’ve always been attracted to worlds that were already built. (I have a history of diving deep into games with dozens of books about the setting, and terrible mechanics. Your Shadowruns and Exalteds and Eberrons and even BattleTechs and such.) I dunno. Maybe the worlds just speak more to me than people do.

I also totally love making the overly long back stories for my characters that modern GM’s tend to find unwelcome. Those should come back in fashion.
 

April TTRPG Maker post 5

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5. Character or worldbuilding?
Definitely worldbuilding. While I do a lot of character builds, the world always comes first. I need the foundation to build the characters on, rather than building a world to suit the characters I want. That said, in my Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/wanderingbeekeeper), I've already got a party of example characters, before I've done more than roughly sketch out the world, and before the dice mechanics are settled. For 1879, I spent weeks researching and building the game world, and simply noted the principal characters and pivotal personalities along the way, fleshing them out and in some cases building character sheets much later.
 
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4. Favorite type of game scenario?

I love intrigue, as shown by my love of #Amber, #LordsOfGossamerAndShadow, #LordsOfOlympus, #DeltaGreen, and many more suspense and conspiracy theory type games. However, I have trouble writing the scenarios for those, and the webs that must be maintained quickly become tangled with holes in the logic. I still work on those, and try to read scenarios that have those types of situations and learn from them.

I also like open-ended type scenarios that have a real impact on the game world. I take being a fan of the characters quite seriously, and love to see not just the current situation, but their progress from it.
 
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4. Favorite type of game scenario?

I’m usually looking for something I can steal. That is, I’m probably not playing the game for which the scenario was written, but some other thing. I like a scenario that lets me drop it into what I am doing without too much shoehorning.

I also like pregnant stasis, where the scenario is set in a little bottle with all these complications in a subtle equilibrium, just waiting for some stimulus to come along and start gears moving. By the time it’s done, that place is never the same, neither are the PCs, and its all the PCs fault.
 
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Day 3: Key to your making process?

My key seems to be designing based on a story or theme. Without that impetus, it's hard to get the gears going, which is the reason that it's hard for me to do for-hire work. I'll read something, and it will start the gears spinning with a different take on a subject or taking a different tack to get to the perfect framing of the question that's at the foundation of the design.

I find that without that base, I tend to flounder and lose sight of the story that I started out to tell. I also have a lot of trouble "killing my darlings". Sometimes, my underlying fundaments are incorrect or flawed, and I have a hard time getting past that obstacle.
 
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Day 2: Describe your work

My day-to-day work as a software architect sort of frames my writing and my game design work; I've found that I'm better at reframing the question or looking at the problem from a different angle to create something new rather than starting from scratch. With my limited time, I find that's also most efficient for me to get from start to finish.

Because of this, adventures and hacks are what I excel in, though I can do original work (and am working on an original for my favorite medium- play by e-mail). I find that's the exception, not the rule, but when I do so, I tend to want it to be perfect rather than iterate, which can keep ideas in development hell for a long time.
 
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Day 3: Key to your making process?

I design for me, not you. Sorry. That is, I build something because I want to use it for something or learn something specific from it. If others can gain something out of the result, that's great, but it isn't really the goal. This is one of the reasons I give gaming stuff I make away for free.

One drawback of this is that once I've gotten what I can out of something, I lose interest in it and tend to never finish it. This used to bother me. Then I came up with the "seed" concept and it hasn't damaged my calm as badly.
 
#AprilTTRPGMaker

Day 2: Describe your work

Most of my effort seems to turn out being twists of, and modifications to, other people's games. So, I consider myself more of a hacker than a designer. Often, my goals in hacking something run orthogonal, or even antithetical, to the design goals of the original.

The few original games I have made tend towards being toys with one really good idea surrounded by a lot of drek. Most of these have been games for contests and stuff, so that doesn't bother me that much.
 
Thanks to Kira Magrann for #AprilTTRPGMaker

1. Andrew Ragland, line developer for FASA's 1879, the steampunk sequel to Earthdawn and replacement for Shadowrun in the FASA cosmology. I've previously done work for Earthdawn, Shadowrun, and Mage: The Ascension.
2. I'm a worldbuilder and storyteller. I like running sandbox campaigns and building conlangs, mapping ecosystems to look for empty niches that need critters created, and detailing out absurdly complex alternate histories. Currently I'm doing all of the above for a steampunk fantasy #ttrpg, 1879, and doing probably far too much research in the process. There's just so many stories out there, ones that actually happened and ones that gamers are telling to each other. I have a Patreon at http://www.patreon.com/wanderingbeekeeper where I'm building a classless, level-less mechanic with dynamic character attributes integrated into an early medieval, low-magic world.
 

April TTRPG Maker posts 1 and 2

Thanks to Kira Magrann for #AprilTTRPGMaker

1. Andrew Ragland, line developer for FASA's 1879, the steampunk sequel to Earthdawn and replacement for Shadowrun in the FASA cosmology. I've previously done work for Earthdawn, Shadowrun, and Mage: The Ascension.
2. I'm a worldbuilder and storyteller. I like running sandbox campaigns and building conlangs, mapping ecosystems to look for empty niches that need critters created, and detailing out absurdly complex alternate histories. Currently I'm doing all of the above for a steampunk fantasy #ttrpg, 1879, and doing probably far too much research in the process. There's just so many stories out there, ones that actually happened and ones that gamers are telling to each other. I have a Patreon at http://www.patreon.com/wanderingbeekeeper where I'm building a classless, level-less mechanic with dynamic character attributes integrated into an early medieval, low-magic world.
 
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